Sexual Health

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Sexual Health

What is sexual health?

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines sexual health as "the state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being related to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction and infirmity. Sexual health requires a positive, respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. For sexual health to be attained and maintained, the sexual rights of all persons must be respected, protected and fulfilled."

For questions about the Safer Sex Spots and other sexual health resources, please contact:

Amanda Stevens, MPH
Sexual Health Coordinator
email: [email protected]

 

Dam Delivery ships free kits of safer sex supplies to students anywhere in the United States. Customize your kits by choosing from our variety of barriers and lubricants. Orders ship every Wednesday. For all available products, details on supplies and shipments, and to order your kits, click here.

Have a general question about sexual health?

Submit your questions about sexual health here. Then, check the Barometer weekly to see if our sexual health team has chosen your question to answer.

Submit question here

 

 

"Give A Dam With CAPE" Podcast

Join our hosts each week for conversations and interviews on topics related to CAPE’s mission.

Listen to the Podcast

 

 

Sexual Health Question/Answer Video Series

Watch Barrier Method QA Video

Watch Contraception QA Video

Safer Sex Spots: Products

Don't want to break the bank on barrier methods? Curious what condoms and other barriers are available on campus? You can find the following products at Safer Sex Spots throughout campus:

  • Condoms:
    • external lubricated
    • non-lubricated
    • larger
    • non-latex
    • ribbed & flavored
  • Receptive condoms
  • Dental dams
  • Flavored and unflavored lubricant

Safer Sex Spots: Locations

PLEASE NOTE: Many of our Safer Sex Spots are closed until further notice. Check out our Remote Programming Page for our online sexual health resources.

Barrier Methods

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Barrier Methods

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Barrier methods of contraception offer different levels of protection. Some protect only against unwanted pregnancy; others protect only against sexually transmitted infections (STIs); and some protect against both STIs and pregnancy.

How to use a condom made for the penis

The condom is rolled over the erect or hardened penis. 

  1. Condoms should not be used with oil-based lubricants such as petroleum jelly, Vaseline, or mineral and vegetable oil. Such lubricants damage the condom.
  2. Check the expiration date and make sure the package is still airtight. Open carefully.
  3. Make sure the rim of the rolled up condom is facing outward and place it on the head of the penis/object.
  4. Pinch the tip to leave room for ejaculate.
  5. Roll condom to base of penis/object.
  6. Enjoy the action. When finished, hold base of condom while pulling out.
  7. Remove condom and throw in trash (do not flush).

Remember, practice is important to ensure proper use!

How to use a condom made for the vagina 

Remove the condom from its package and rub the outside of the pouch together to be sure the lubrication is evenly spread within it. Be sure that the inner (smaller) ring is at the bottom (closed) end of the pouch, and then hold the pouch with the open (larger) end hanging down.

Squeeze the inner ring with the thumb and middle finger, and then insert it and the pouch into the vaginal opening. With the index finger, push the inner ring and pouch all the way up into the vagina against the cervix

The penis should be guided into the condom in order to ensure that it does not slip into the vagina outside of the condom. After intercourse squeeze and twist the outer ring gently and then pull the condom out keeping the semen inside. Then simply discard as you would a male condom.

Remember, practice is important to ensure proper use! Learn more about condoms made for the vagina (PDF).

Other barrier methods

Hormonal Methods

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Hormonal Methods

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Hormonal methods of contraception protect against unwanted pregnancy, but not sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Here is information on each form of hormonal contraception.

The pill (Oral contraceptives; birth control pills)

  • Combined effects of synthetic hormones called estrogen and progestin.
  • Estrogen decreases production of the hormone that helps develop the ova within the ovaries.
  • Progestin prevents the proper growth of the uterine lining and thickens the cervical mucus forming a barrier against sperm.
  • Pills can be progestin only or a combination of estrogen and progestin.

The shot (Depo-provera)

  • Injectable progesterone that lasts for three months and prevents ovulation.

The patch (Ortho evera)

  • Worn for a week at a time for three weeks, then no patch for three weeks.
  • Can be worn on the buttocks, abdomen, upper torso or upper arm.

The ring (NuvaRing)

  • Inserted into the vagina and left in place for three weeks.

Emergency contraception

  • Combination progestin and estrogen or just progestin; but it’s concentrated enough to interrupt a women’s normal hormonal patterns and prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse has already occurred.
  • Works better if taken right away, but can be taken for up to five days after unprotected sex.
  • Progestin only pill (Plan B) reduces risk of pregnancy by 89 percent.
  • Combined pills reduce the chances by 75 percent.
  • Is available over the counter at the SHS Pharmacy.