Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center

311 Plageman Building, Student Health Services
541-737-2030
survivoradvocacy@oregonstate.edu
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Please be advised that email is not considered a secure form of communication, and confidentiality cannot be guaranteed if you forward information of an urgent nature. 

The OSU Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center is committed to providing safe and confidential support to all university community members, including students, faculty and staff affected by different forms of violence. With the goal of empowering survivors to be able to make informed choices, the Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center will serve as a first point of contact for survivors and their allies, in order to provide needed information about their choices and their rights, referrals to desired services, and support for their right to regain control over their lives.

We understand that any form of interpersonal violence, including sexual assault, dating or domestic violence, stalking, harassment, or bullying can have a profound and harmful impact on those persons experiencing one or more of these events and to the community at large.

The Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center is dedicated to the commitment of believing disclosures of violence, and providing resources to aid in the healing process. We are further dedicated to the value of all persons and their right to make their own choices.

listen. believe. support.

For safe, confidential support and resources, call 541-737-2030

We offer free and confidential services for all OSU students, faculty and staff affected by different forms of sexual harassment, including sexual assault, unwanted sexual experiences, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking.

  • Initial point of contact for discussion of survivor rights and choices to initiate any utilization of services on campus or in the community
  • Crisis intervention and stabilization
  • Safety planning
  • Support groups for survivors
  • On-campus advocacy for academic and housing concerns
  • Information about reporting options to law enforcement or school officials
  • Accompaniment to medical examinations, police, and Title IX hearings
  • Referrals to on- and off-campus resources

About confidentiality

Oregon state law has granted confidentiality for any communication between a person seeking support as a result of sexual or intimate partner violence and the campus-based survivor advocate. 


For more information on Oregon State University's commitment and efforts to support survivors, please visit leadership.oregonstate.edu/survivor-support.

How to Get Help

  • Go to a safe place immediately if you feel in danger.
  • If this is an emergency, call 911 immediately.
  • If this is a medical emergency during evenings and weekends, contact Good Samaritan Hospital at 541-768-5021.
  • If you would like an advocate to accompany you to the hospital for medical care, contact CARDV at 541-754-0110.
  • Seek on-campus medical care (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners at 541-737-9355) to determine your physical safety, provide prophylactic measures, and inform you of your options for collecting forensic evidence if desired.
  • Talk to a trusted person who can support you.
  • Consider talking to a confidential advocate on campus (Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center at 541-737-2030) for help with understanding what happened, provide you with information, assist you in finding the resources that you most need, and help you understand your rights as a student, staff or faculty member, including confidential resources and reporting options.
  • Consider talking to an off-campus advocate at the Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence (CARDV) at 541-754-0110, or to a counselor at CAPS Sexual Assault Support Services at 541-737-7604.

Confidential Resources

OSU Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center

  • Student Health Services, Plageman Bldg., Room 311
  • 541-737-2030 or email at survivoradvocacy@oregonstate.edu
  • Provides safe and confidential resources and support within the OSU community for survivors of violence including 24/7 crisis response
  • Houses a community resource center that includes a library of literature related to sexual and interpersonal violence; videos for information and skill building, and a safe place to gather

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

  • Snell Hall, Fifth Floor
  • 541-737-2131
  • Provides 24/7 crisis response, confidential support, information and/or counseling for survivors of violence

Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) at Student Health Services

  • Plageman Building
  • 541-737-9355
  • Provides confidential medical care, including emergency contraception, STI testing or treatment, and SAFE examinations for sexual assault

Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence (CARDV)

  • Corvallis, Oregon
  • 541-754-0110 or 1-800-927-0197
  • Provides off-campus 24/7 crisis response and off-campus advocacy services and support
  • Connects survivors with county SANE through Good Samaritan Hospital

Reporting Options

OSU Office of Equal Opportunity and Access (OEOA)

  • Snell Hall, Third Floor
  • 541-737-3556
  • Accepts formal and informal reports of sexual violence and harassment, investigates, and assists with remedies for survivors

Oregon State Police (OSP)

  • 541-737-7000 or 911
  • Responds to immediate safety concerns and criminal violations, including sexual and intimate partner violence, which may lead to criminal proceedings

Corvallis Police Department (CPD)

  • 541-766-6924 or 911
  • Responds to immediate safety concerns and criminal violations to parties living off OSU campus, including sexual and intimate partner violence, which may lead to criminal proceedings

All OSU employees must consult on disclosures of any form of sexual harassment, including sexual/dating/domestic violence and stalking.

National 24-Hour Hotlines

RAINN (Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network)

National Domestic Violence Hotline                                     

Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence

National Stalking Resource Center (NSRC)                           

National Human Trafficking Hotline and Resource Center

GLBT National Help Center

National Suicide Prevention Life Line Program

Oregon Attorney General’s Sexual Assault Task Force

Referweb.net/info or 211

Common Reactions

  • Emotional reactions can vary considerably from person to person with some feeling fear, sadness or anger. There is not one way of responding emotionally to sexual or interpersonal violence.
  • Other people may experience a sense of numbness.
  • Many people experience shock or disbelief, or even denial.
  • Many people have reported feeling a loss of control or a feeling of helplessness.
  • Many people blame themselves for things they did or did not do.
  • Most people cannot remember the entire story, may have blotchy memories, or complete gaps of memory. This is a normal response to something that is traumatic, highly stressful, unexpected, and confusing.
  • All of these reactions are normal.
  • After an experience of sexual violence, dating violence or stalking, you might be experiencing some of the following normal responses:
    • Guilt, fear or self blame
    • Fear of being blamed by others
    • Intense feelings of sadness, anger, or fear
    • Confusion, denial or memory difficulties
    • Feelings of numbness
    • Wanting to avoid talking about this or going places that are reminders
    • Having difficulty trusting others
    • Having difficulty in school, work and/or relationships

     

MYTH

FACT

Rapes only occur by strangers.

Eighty-five percent of all rapes occur by someone the survivor knows.

If the survivor was drinking, it is their fault.

More than 50 percent of all experiences of sexual violence include alcohol and drugs by one or both of the parties. Many rapists will use alcohol and drugs as a weapon to make the survivor more vulnerable.

Rape cannot occur if the people are (or were) dating.

More than half of all rapes occur in a dating or previously dating relationship.

Rape only happens to women.

Sexual violence is about power and domination, and can be experienced by all people, regarding of sexual or gender identity.

 

Supporting a Survivor

  • Be supportive and believe their story. Remember they may have trouble understanding or remembering what happened to them. Your belief will help in their recovery.
  • Be a good listener by validating their experience and please do not ask questions about the details of the experience. Just listen to what they are able to tell you.
  • Find out what they need from you.
  • Talk with them about seeking support and information from a confidential resource such as Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center, a SANE (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner), or a counselor at CAPS.
  • Allow your friend to make their own decisions about what they want to do. Do NOT make the decisions for them.
  • Listen, believe, accept, validate and be supportive.
  • Communicate to them that it is not their fault under any circumstances, including what they wore, or what they did.

After an experience of sexual violence, dating violence or stalking, your friend might be experiencing some of the following responses:

  • Guilt, fear, or self blame
  • Fear of being blamed by others
  • Intense feelings of sadness, anger or fear
  • Confusion, denial, or memory gaps
  • Feelings of numbness or “spaciness”
  • Wanting to avoid talking about the event or going places that are reminders
  • Having difficulty trusting others
  • Having difficulty in school or work

 The truth about sexual violence:

  • It is never the fault of the survivor. Your friend was not assaulted because of something they did or did not do. It has nothing to do with what they were wearing. It has nothing to do with going to a social event. It has nothing to do with not fighting or not saying “no” loud enough.
  • Sexual assault can occur in dating situations, in friendships, and between acquaintances who’ve just met. It happens to people of all sexual orientations, gender identities, cultural identities, ethnicities, ages, and social classes.
  • Sexual assault occurs because there was a person in the room willing to commit sexual or interpersonal violence. A person who was willing to coerce, manipulate, pressure, or overpower your friend in order to hurt them. A person who did not receive their ongoing, freely given consent.

 

MYTH

FACT

Rapes only occur by strangers.

Eighty-five percent of all rapes occur by someone the survivor knows.

If the survivor was drinking, it is their fault.

More than 50 percent of all experiences of sexual violence include alcohol and drugs by one or both of the parties. Many rapists will use alcohol and drugs as a weapon to make the survivor more vulnerable.

Rape cannot occur if the people are (or were) dating.

More than half of all rapes occur in a dating or previously dating relationship.

Rape only happens to women.

Sexual violence is about power and domination, and can be experienced by all people, regarding of sexual or gender identity.

 

Educational Programs

The OSU Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center is committed to raising the awareness of the impact of sexual and interpersonal violence on both the individual and the community. We have developed training programs and presentations to educate and inform the OSU community of this harmful impact and to provide suggestions for the development of attitudes and behaviors that are inclusive, just, and honoring to both individuals and community members impacted by violence.

How to Support a Survivor

  • This workshop/presentation provides information and teaches skills in how to respond to a friend/colleague/family who has disclosed their experience of some form of sexual or interpersonal violence. We recognize the importance of a survivor experiencing a compassionate and non-judgmental response upon their disclosure that avoids any comments that can be interpreted as victim-blaming. This workshop/presentation will teach listening skills, communication skills, and challenges of some of the rape myths that contribute to a survivor’s difficulty in recovery

How to Take Care of Yourself After a Sexual Assault

  • This workshop/presentation/discussion group was created to help survivors understand the impact of the sexual/interpersonal assault and to assist in learning coping strategies for their healing process. It offers information about rape myths that contribute to the harm of sexual violence. It offers suggestions for journeying through the healing process including resources that are available to survivors both on- and off- campus. It has been developed to empower the survivor to regain their sense of control and choice, to be validated and believed in their experience and to offer information and support for their chosen recovery.

Sexual Assault: How We Respond and What to Expect

  • This workshop/presentation provides trauma-informed, survivor-centered information about the psychological and social impact of violence on individuals. The workshop is intended to help the audience understand the varying responses of survivors so that their response can be supportive and helpful.

Reporting and Disclosure Options: Non-Confidential and Confidential

  • This presentation identifies the options for survivors and community members for discussing the violence experience. Its intent is to inform the audience of reporting options to the school and/or the legal system, define those who are mandatory reporters to the Office of Equity and Inclusion, and what that process would entail. It also identifies for the audience what confidentiality is and who the confidential resources are on- and off- campus.

Also available are customized workshops and presentations that meet the needs of students groups and campus departments. To request any of these workshops or presentations, use the online program request form.


Sexual Assault Awareness Month

April is designated nationally and at OSU as Sexual Assault Awareness Month. During this month the Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center will team with other campus partners to present a month-long schedule of events dedicated to raising awareness of the impact of sexual violence on individuals and the community. These events typically include Take Back the Night, a rally and speak out; a documentary series; forum discussions; speaker presentations; sexual violence prevention presentations; and other events created by student organizations.