Prevention Center

With a vision to create a safe and supportive living and learning environment, the Prevention team strives to ensure students can thrive in a community free of violence and high-risk alcohol and other drug use.

Mission:

The Prevention team at SHS is committed to advancing the health, wellness and academic success of our students through:

  1. Prevention of high-risk alcohol use and illicit/harmful drug use, to include population-level prevention.
  2. Prevention of sexual assault, interpersonal violence, stalking, hazing, bullying, and other forms of violence.
  3. Directing early intervention for students with indicated needs through the IMPACT program.
  4. Supporting students who are in active recovery from addiction through the Collegiate Recovery Community.

 

Contact:

Robert Reff, Director
Prevention, Advocacy and Wellness
robert.reff@oregonstate.edu
541-737-7564

Alcohol and Other Drugs

Oregon State University is committed to maintaining an educational environment and workplace free from drugs and alcohol. The university supports programs for the prevention of abuse of alcohol and controlled substances by university students and employees, as well as assistance programs for those with problems related to controlled substance abuse. We strive to educate the campus community about responsible alcohol and other drug use.

Federal Regulations

Part 86, the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations (Education Department General Administrative Regulations [EDGAR]), requires that, as a condition of receiving funds or any other form of financial assistance under any federal program, an institution of higher education (IHE) must certify that it has adopted and implemented a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees. If audited, failure to comply with the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations may cause an institution to forfeit eligibility for federal funding.

In order to be able to certify its compliance with the regulations, an IHE must adopt and implement a drug prevention program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by all students and employees both on school premises and as part of any of its activities. Creating a program that complies with the regulations requires an IHE to do the following:

  • Annually notify each employee and student, in writing, of standards of conduct; a description of appropriate sanctions for violation of federal, state, and local law and campus policy; a description of health risks associated with AOD use; and a description of available treatment programs.­­
  • Develop a sound method for distributing annual notification information to every student and staff member each year.
  • Prepare a biennial review on the effectiveness of its AOD programs and the consistency of sanction enforcement.
  • Maintain its biennial review on file, so that, if requested to do so by the U.S. Department of Education, the campus can submit it.

Annual Notification

2016-2017 Annual Notification of Alcohol and Other Drug Information

OSU is required by law to notify annually all students, staff, and faculty of alcohol and other drug policies, sanctions, and risks associated with use.

This notification provides the campus community the following information:

  1. Drug and alcohol programs available to employees and/or students.
  2. Health risks associated with alcohol abuse and illicit drug use.
  3. Standards of conduct and disciplinary sanctions for students regarding alcohol and drug use.
  4. Standards of conduct and disciplinary sanctions for employees regarding alcohol and drug use.
  5. Federal and state legal sanctions.

Information for Students, Faculty, and Staff of Oregon State University

A. Drug and alcohol programs available to employees or students

At Oregon State University, we strive to provide an excellent teaching and learning environment that supports healthy choices for living. Included in the choices that confront everyone are decisions about the use of alcohol and other substances. If you or someone you know is being affected by alcohol or drug use, please use the recommended resources below.

Resources for Students

If you have any questions about the purpose of this email or its content, please contact:

  • Robert C. Reff, Ph.D.  – Director of Prevention, Advocacy & Wellness, Student Health Services 

Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor

Student Health Services offers individual sessions with a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). These sessions are confidential and can help students create a personalized plan to meet their goals related to reducing substance use. The service is free unless a student is referred as part of a conduct violation or other sanction. To make an appointment, call 541-737-9355.  

e-CHUG

The e-CHUG is a brief, anonymous, online assessment tool. It takes about 10 minutes to complete and helps students understand their use of alcohol.

e-TOKE

The electronic THC Online Knowledge Experience, or e-TOKE, is a brief, interactive marijuana-specific assessment and feedback tool that provides insight into marijuana use, utilizing personalized information about students’ behaviors and risk factors. The anonymous, self-guided assessment takes about 10-15 minutes to complete.

Counseling and Psychological Services

541-737-2131

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is dedicated to addressing the challenges and difficulties students face. The services provided by CAPS are designed to help students understand themselves better, create and maintain satisfying relationships, improve their academic performance, and make healthy and satisfying career and life choices. To schedule an appointment or learn about services please click here.

Collegiate Recovery Community: Student Success Built on Sobriety

541-737-1184 or recovery@oregonstate.edu

The Collegiate Recovery Community (CRC) seeks to engage and support students in recovery or those who are contemplating entering into recovery. The community is rooted in the belief that no student should feel alone and that every student should receive the support they need, in the way they need it, from the people who they find most comfortable. The CRC’s doors are open to anyone who is looking for support.  Additionally, Dixon Lodge is a dedicated recovery living community with scholarships available to students. For more information about the CRC or special housing options, see: http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/recovery

AlcoholEdu

All new, first-year, degree-seeking students on both the Corvallis and Cascades campuses are required to complete the online program, AlcoholEdu. This requirement helps to foster an environment that prevents high-risk alcohol use and subsequent negative academic and personal outcomes. AlcoholEdu is just one of many methods which attempt to correct college myths and norms, as well as provide students with relevant policies and resources prior to matriculation.

There is evidence which supports the efficacy of AlcoholEdu. In the program, students are taken through several interactive modules that include lessons such as how to recognize and respond to an alcohol-related emergency; how to use low-risk drinking strategies; how to model safer decision-making; and strategies to be an active bystander. Students are required to complete Part 1 of this two-part course prior to the first day of classes, and Part 2 thirty days after completion of Part 1. If a student does not complete AlcoholEdu, a grades hold is placed on their student account. That hold is lifted once all parts of the course are completed. For more information about AlcoholEdu please visit: http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/welcome

Resources for Faculty and Staff

Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

Contact:  Cascade Centers Inc. 1-800-433-2320

OSU provides an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) available to all employees with .50 FTE or greater appointments. Through this program, each employee is allowed up three visits per calendar year at no cost for evaluation, limited counseling and referral. Employees who live and work elsewhere in the state are provided the same services in their local areas. All employee contact with the EAP is confidential. 

For more information, click here.

Time off Work

Employees seeking treatment for substance abuse may be eligible for time off from work through the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and/or Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA). Contact the Benefits section of Human Resources at 541-737-2805 for more information.

Health Insurance Coverage for Treatment

PEBB Health Insurance plans (PEBB Statewide, Providence, Moda, Kaiser and AllCare) provide coverage for substance abuse treatment. Consult your medical plan for details. For questions or assistance, contact the Benefits section of Human Resources at 541-737-2805.

Resources for Students, Faculty, or Staff

12-Step Programs

Oregon State University acknowledges the value of 12-step programs in attaining and maintaining a drug-free lifestyle. Schedules of meetings for Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Cocaine Anonymous, Al-anon and other 12-step groups can be obtained from the Benton County Health Department, 530 N.W. 27th Street, Corvallis, OR 97330, by calling 541-766-6835 or by visiting:

AA meetings

NA Meetings

B. Health risks associated with alcohol abuse and illicit drug use

Commonly abused drugs

Click here for the full chart.

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Effects

Nicotine

Found in cigarettes, cigars, bidis,  smokeless tobacco (snuff, spit tobacco, chew)

Smoked, snorted, chewed

Chronic lung disease; cardiovascular disease; stroke; cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, cervix, kidney, bladder, and acute myeloid leukemia; adverse pregnancy outcomes; addiction; increased blood pressure and heart rate

 

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Effects

Alcohol (ethyl alcohol)

Found in liquor, beer, and wine

Swallowed

In low doses euphoria, mild stimulation, relaxation, lowered inhibitions. 

In higher doses: drowsiness, slurred speech, nausea, emotional volatility, loss of coordination, visual distortions, impaired memory, sexual dysfunction, loss of consciousness. Increased risk of injuries, violence, fetal damage (in pregnant women); depression; neurologic deficits; hypertension; liver and heart disease; addiction; fatal overdose

 

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Effects

Marijuana

Blunt, dope, ganja, grass, herb, joint, bud, Mary Jane, pot, reefer, green, trees, smoke, sinsemilla, skunk, weed

Smoked, swallowed

Euphoria; relaxation; slowed reaction time; distorted sensory perception; impaired balance and coordination; increased heart rate and appetite; impaired learning, memory; anxiety; panic attacks; psychosis; cough, frequent respiratory infections; possible mental health decline; addiction

Hashish

Boom, gangster, hash, hash oil, hemp

Smoked, swallowed

Euphoria; relaxation; slowed reaction time; distorted sensory perception; impaired balance and coordination; increased heart rate and appetite; impaired learning, memory; anxiety; panic attacks; psychosis; cough, frequent respiratory infections; possible mental health decline; addiction



Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Effects

Heroin

Diacetylmorphine: smack, horse, brown sugar, dope, H, junk, skag, skunk, white horse, China white; cheese (with OTC cold medicine and antihistamine)

Injected, smoked, snorted

Euphoria; drowsiness; impaired coordination; dizziness; confusion; nausea; sedation; feeling of heaviness in the body; slowed or arrested breathing; Constipation; endocarditis; hepatitis; HIV; addiction; fatal overdose

Opium

Laudanum, paregoric: big O, black stuff, block, gum, hop

Swallowed, smoked

Euphoria; drowsiness; impaired coordination; dizziness; confusion; nausea; sedation; feeling of heaviness in the body; slowed or arrested breathing; Constipation; endocarditis; hepatitis; HIV; addiction; fatal overdose



Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Effects

Cocaine

Cocaine hydrochloride: blow, bump, C, candy, Charlie, coke, crack, flake, rock, snow, toot

snorted, smoked, injected

Increased heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, metabolism; feelings of exhilaration; increased energy, mental alertness; tremors; reduced appetite; irritability; anxiety; panic; paranoia; violent behavior; psychosis; nasal damage from snorting; weight loss; insomnia; cardiac or cardiovascular complications; stroke; seizures; addiction

Amphetamine

Biphetamine, Dexedrine: bennies, black beauties, crosses, hearts, LA turnaround, speed, truck drivers, uppers

swallowed, snorted, smoked, injected

Increased heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, metabolism; feelings of exhilaration; increased energy, mental alertness; tremors; reduced appetite; irritability; anxiety; panic; paranoia; violent behavior; psychosis; weight loss, insomnia; cardiac or cardiovascular complications; stroke; seizures; addiction

Methamphetamine

Desoxyn: meth, ice, crank, chalk, crystal, fire, glass, go fast, speed

swallowed, snorted, smoked, injected

Increased heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, metabolism; feelings of exhilaration; increased energy, mental alertness; tremors; reduced appetite; irritability; anxiety; panic; paranoia; violent behavior; psychosis; severe dental problems; weight loss; insomnia; cardiac or cardiovascular complications; stroke; seizures; addiction



Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Effects

MDMA

(methylenedioxy- methamphetamine)

Ecstasy, Adam, clarity, Eve, lover's speed, peace, uppers

swallowed, snorted, injected

Mild hallucinogenic effects; increased tactile sensitivity; empathic feelings; lowered inhibition; anxiety; chills; sweating; teeth clenching; muscle cramping

Flunitrazepam**

Rohypnol: forget-me pill, Mexican Valium, R2, roach, Roche, roofies, roofinol, rope, rophies

swallowed, snorted

Sleep disturbances; depression; impaired memory; hyperthermia; addiction; sedation; muscle relaxation; confusion; memory loss; dizziness; impaired coordination; mild hallucinogenic effects; increased tactile sensitivity; empathic feelings; lowered inhibition; anxiety; chills; sweating; teeth clenching; muscle cramping

GHB**

Gamma-hydroxybutyrate: G, Georgia home boy, grievous bodily harm, liquid ecstasy, soap, scoop, goop, liquid X

swallowed

Drowsiness; nausea; headache; disorientation; loss of coordination; memory loss; mild hallucinogenic effects; increased tactile sensitivity; empathic feelings; lowered inhibition; anxiety; chills; teeth clenching; sweating; muscle cramping; sleep disturbances; depression; impaired memory; hyperthermia; addiction; unconsciousness; seizures; coma



Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Effects

Ketamine

Ketalar SV: cat Valium, K, Special K, vitamin K

injected, snorted, smoked

Anxiety; tremors; numbness; memory loss; nausea; feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment; impaired motor function; analgesia; impaired memory; delirium; respiratory depression and arrest; death

PCP and analogs

Phencyclidine: angel dust, boat, hog, love boat, peace pill

swallowed, smoked, injected

Anxiety; tremors; numbness; memory loss; nausea; feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment; impaired motor function; Analgesia; psychosis; aggression; violence; slurred speech; loss of coordination; hallucinations

Salvia divinorum

Salvia, Shepherdess's Herb, Maria Pastora, magic mint, Sally-D

chewed, swallowed, smoked

Anxiety; tremors; numbness; memory loss; nausea; feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment; impaired motor function

Dextromethorphan (DXM)

Found in some cough and cold medications: Robotripping, Robo, Triple C

swallowed

Anxiety; tremors; numbness; memory loss; nausea; feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment; impaired motor function; Euphoria; slurred speech; confusion; dizziness; distorted visual perceptions



Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Effects

LSD

Lysergic acid diethylamide: acid, blotter, cubes, microdot yellow sunshine, blue heaven

swallowed, absorbed through mouth tissues

Altered states of perception and feeling; nausea; hallucinations; increased body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure; loss of appetite; sweating; sleeplessness; numbness, dizziness, weakness, tremors; impulsive behavior; rapid shifts in emotion; flashbacks, Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder

Mescaline

Buttons, cactus, mesc, peyote

swallowed, smoked

Altered states of perception and feeling; hallucinations; nausea; increased body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure; loss of appetite; sweating; sleeplessness; numbness, dizziness, weakness, tremors; impulsive behavior; rapid shifts in emotion

Psilocybin

Magic mushrooms, purple passion, shrooms, little smoke

swallowed

Altered states of perception and feeling; hallucinations; nausea; nervousness; paranoia; panic



Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Effects

Anabolic steroids

Anadrol, Oxandrin, Durabolin, Depo- Testosterone, Equipoise: roids, juice, gym candy, pumpers

Injected, swallowed, applied to skin

No intoxication effects. Hypertension; blood clotting and cholesterol changes; liver cysts; hostility and aggression; acne

In adolescents: premature stoppage of growth.           

In males: prostate cancer, reduced sperm production, shrunken testicles, breast enlargement.

In females: menstrual irregularities, development of beard and other masculine characteristics

Inhalants

Solvents (paint thinners, gasoline, glues); gases (butane, propane, aerosol propellants, nitrous oxide); nitrites (isoamyl, isobutyl, cyclohexyl): laughing gas, poppers, snappers, whippets

Inhaled through nose or mouth

Cramps; muscle weakness; depression; memory impairment; damage to cardiovascular and nervous systems; unconsciousness; sudden death

 

Also, varies by chemical: Stimulation; loss of inhibition; headache; nausea or vomiting; slurred speech; loss of motor coordination; wheezing

 

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

CNS  Depressants

For more information on prescription medications, please visit the Commonly Abused Prescription Drug Chart

Stimulants

Opioid Pain Relievers

Notes

* Some of the health risks are directly related to the route of drug administration. For example, injection drug use can increase the risk of infection through needle contamination with staphylococci, HIV, hepatitis, and other organisms.

** Associated with sexual assaults.

Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment

More than three decades of scientific research show that treatment can help drug-addicted individuals stop drug use, avoid relapse, and successfully recover their lives. Based on this research, 13 fundamental principles that characterize effective drug abuse treatment have been developed. These principles are detailed in NIDA's Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide. The guide also describes different types of science-based treatments and provides answers to commonly asked questions.

C. Standards of conduct and disciplinary sanctions for students regarding alcohol and drug use

Student Conduct and Community Standards

The current Student Conduct Code can be found here.

University Housing and Dining Policy Guide

The current student University Housing and Dining Policy Guide can be found here.

Students that are found responsible for violation of university policy related to alcohol or drugs are typically referred to the IMPACT program at Student Health Services. For more information on the IMPACT program, please click here.

D. Standards of conduct and disciplinary sanctions for employees regarding alcohol and drug use

Oregon State University responds to cases of alcohol abuse and illegal drug activity by employees or students on a case-by-case basis. Details of each case are taken into consideration along with outcome of any legal action against the individual. Employees and students found to be in violation of the University’s drug-free campus and workplace policy may be subject to conduct or disciplinary sanctions consistent with applicable provisions of state and federal laws, as well as University and Oregon State Board of Higher Education administrative rules. Sanctions imposed by the University can range from a warning or disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment or suspension from school. Other potential sanctions may include employment or academic probation, restrictions, attendance in an educational program, or referral to counseling or treatment. OSU employees and students who violate drug laws are subject to prosecution in the courts. Additionally, the law requires the University to report to the United States Department of Education any recipient of federal financial aid (e.g., Pell Grants, research grants) who is convicted of a drug-related crime on University property or at University events. The law also requires the University to report to federal agencies any employee convicted of violating a criminal drug statute if the employee is involved in work which is supported by that federal agency.

Oregon State University complies with the United States Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act, the United States Drug-Free Workplace Act, Oregon Revised Statues 352.008, and OSSHE Administrative Rule 580-19-001. Annual distribution of drug-free campus and workplace information to employees and students is required by law.

For more information please click here.

E. Federal and state legal sanctions

The following are federal penalties and sanctions for illegal possession of a controlled substance. Additional penalties are imposed for trafficking. 

21 U.S.C. 844(a)

  • First conviction: Up to one year imprisonment and fined at least $1,000 but not more than $100,000, or both.
  • After one prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed two years and fined at least $2,500 but not more than $250,000, or both.
  • After two or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed three years and fined at least $5,000 but not more than $250,000, or both.
  • Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine: Mandatory at least five years in prison, not to exceed 20 years and fined up to $250,000, or both, if:
    • 1st conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds five grams.
    • 2nd crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds three grams.
    • 3rd or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds one gram.

21 U.S.C. 853(a)(2) and 881(a)(7)

  • Forfeiture of personal real property used to possess or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than one year imprisonment. (See special sentencing provisions re: crack.)

21 U.S.C. 881(c)(4)

  • Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled substance.

21 U.S.C. 844a

  • Civil fine of up to $10,000 (pending adoption of final regulations).

21 U.S.C. 853a

  • Denial of Federal benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts, and professional and commercial licenses, up to one year for first offense, up to five years for second and subsequent offenses.

18 U.S.C. 922(g).

  • Ineligible to receive or purchase a firearm.

Miscellaneous.

  • Revocation of certain Federal licenses and benefits, e.g., pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., are vested within the authorities of individual Federal agencies.
  • Oregon State University complies with the United States Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act, the United States Drug-Free Workplace Act, Oregon Revised Statues 352.008, and OSSHE Administrative Rule 580-19-001. Annual distribution of drug-free campus and workplace information to employees and students is required by law.

State of Oregon Sanctions

For current information regarding Measure 91 in Oregon please click here.

Oregon Chapter 475 — Controlled Substances; Illegal Drug Cleanup; Paraphernalia; Precursors - click here.

Oregon Chapter 471 – Alcoholic Liquors; Controlled Substances; Drugs - click here.

A guide to alcohol laws and minors can be found here.

up2u

The up2u program is an education-based campus prevention effort that focuses on the reduction of high-risk alcohol use and other drugs. Up2u empowers students to make healthier choices by providing them with information and tools that have been demonstrated to be effective with college students.

Our presenters engage with students in a fun, interactive, positive and intellectually stimulating manner. Up2u is a voluntary program, and presentations are available upon request by faculty, staff, coaches, student organizations, and the Greek community. Students can also meet with up2u staff to ask questions or receive information.

Take the eCHUG alcohol assessment Take the eTOKE marijuana assessment

Students can also use e-CHUG (alcohol) and e-TOKE (marijuana) to receive anonymous information about their own use. These free online tools provide students with information in a meaningful way by comparing their use to campus data, calculating cost spent and calories consumed, and providing specific risk factors.

If you are here because you are required to take an alcohol class, please go to the IMPACT page.

About up2u

Up2u is an education-based campus prevention effort that focuses on the reduction of high-risk  alcohol use. The program utilizes empirically based theories and approaches specifically designed for college students. Our presenters are trained on the following approaches, utilizing them in a fun, interactive, positive, and intellectually stimulating manner.

B.A.S.I.C.S.

Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students is a nationally recognized and empirically validated program for helping students reduce high-risk alcohol behaviors. It focuses on helping students identify negative and harmful consequences of their use. It acknowledges that abstinence from alcohol is the safest option but not always the most acceptable choice for students. Thus, the program focuses on harm reduction as opposed to a “just say no” approach.

Motivational Interviewing

Motivational interviewing has gained widespread acceptance in chemical abuse treatment and college counseling. It is a focused and goal-directed approach to working with college students. It attempts to meet students where they are in terms of change. In this context, the ultimate goal is to help students explore and resolve their ambivalence to changing behaviors around alcohol use.

Social Norms

Social norms approaches assume that students may have inaccurate perceptions about the quantity and frequency of alcohol use of their fellow college students. Often students hear the most provocative and salacious stories about other students. They rarely hear what usually happens as it makes for less outrageous stories. Thus, social norms seek to gather accurate use data and then promote the accurate data in conjunction with healthy and protective behaviors.

Education and Skills Building

Many students lack a thorough understanding about many aspects of alcohol and its effects. Up2u helps students understand the neurological, psychological, and physiological effects of alcohol, blood alcohol levels, gender differences, tolerance, the size of a standard drink, and other relevant topics. Up2u participants receive a customized blood alcohol card to understand the effects of alcohol specific to their weight and gender. Presenters also link the negative academic effects of high risk alcohol use using current campus data.

Use Assessment

In order for students to make safer choices the student must have an understanding of their current use. This includes quantity of alcohol consumed, frequency of consumption, type of alcohol, peak use, and typical use. In order to meet the needs of our students the up2u program has enlisted e-CHUG. This online tool assesses alcohol use, incorporates social norms data and provides students with interesting feedback such as “How many cheeseburgers you drank last month” and “How long would you have to run to burn off what you drank last month.”

Programming Topics

  • Why Do We Drink?
  • What is a Standard Drink?
  • High Risk Behaviors Identification
  • Pouring Demonstration
  • Alcohol 101
  • Social Norms Clarification
  • Blood Alcohol Content
  • Biphasic Effects of Alcohol
  • Drug Interactions with Alcohol
  • Marijuana
  • Sexual Consent
  • Strategies for Lowering Risk
  • Alcohol and Academics
  • Bar Lab Experiment
  • Alcohol and Performance
  • Cost of High Risk Alcohol Use – Financially, Academically, Physically, and Personally
  • Alcohol Induced Blackout
  • Alcohol Myopia
  • Addiction and Dependency
  • Alcohol Poisoning Symptoms and Detox
  • How to Help a Friend
  • Alcohol and Performance

How to Get Help

Oregon State University provides services depending on your needs. The up2u program at Student Health Services can provide you with information and consultation regarding alcohol and drug use. Staff of up2u can talk with you if you are concerned about a friend and are unsure about how best to help them. You may also meet with the clinical staff at Student Health Services at no charge. Counseling and Psychological Services offers free counseling for mental health and chemical-related issues. 

Please note that these services are available for OSU students only.

If you are injured or struggling with medical issues, whether or not they are related to your use of alcohol or drugs, Student Health Services is available to address your needs.

up2u
541-737-7564
up2u@oregonstate.edu
Student Health Services
319 Plageman Building

Student Health Services
541-737-9355
Plageman Building

Counseling and Psychological Services
541-737-2131
http://oregonstate.edu/counsel/
caps@oregonstate.edu
500 Snell Hall

 

If You've Scheduled an up2u Presentation

Thank you for scheduling an up2u alcohol prevention program for your classroom, organization, or group. In order to make the program a success, please have your students complete the following two items before the presentation.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at up2u@oregonstate.edu. Thanks and we look forward to presenting to your students.


Please complete the following items before our alcohol and drug prevention program:

1) Complete the e-CHUG online

This online program is completely anonymous and will give you information about your alcohol use. It will compare you to other OSU students and estimate how much you are spending on alcohol and how many calories you are consuming. It is very important that you complete this before the program.

e-CHUG Link: studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/health-promotion/alcohol-and-other-drugs/e-chug

2) Complete the customized Blood Alcohol Content card form

Form: http://oregonstate.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_a61RFqBjXsAhA8J

The presenters will bring you a customized BAC card if you complete the survey. There are only five questions on this survey and it will only take you a few minutes to complete. It is important that you do this ASAP so we have time to print your customized card prior to the program. Please complete it at least 24 hours before the program.

e-CHUG

Curious to test your knowledge about alcohol?
Want to learn more about alcohol use?
Want feedback on your use of alcohol compared to other Oregon State students?

Electronic Checkup to Go (e-CHUG)

What is e-CHUG?

The e-CHUG is an online survey for Oregon State University students. The e-CHUG is a brief, anonymous assessment tool that takes about 10 minutes to complete that will help you gain insight into your relationship with alcohol.

What does e-CHUG do?

When you begin the e-CHUG, you are asked to enter some demographic information and information on your personal alcohol use. Once completed, you submit the form. The information you entered is processed and your responses are compared to national and OSU norms. You are encouraged to print this for your review. The e-CHUG individualized feedback provides students with useful information on such items as:

  • Quantity and frequency of drinking, caloric intake
  • Peak Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC)
  • Norm comparisons
  • Income spent on alcohol
  • Tolerance levels
  • Consequences of alcohol use
  • Genetic risk score
  • Explanations and advice
  • Referral information

What do I need to use the e-CHUG?

  • A computer
  • Internet access
  • A JavaScript enabled Internet browser
  • About 8-10 minutes
  • A printer (to print the feedback)

If you find after taking the e-CHUG that you would like to discuss your results with an IMPACT staff member at Student Health Services, please call 541-737-7552 to request an appointment.

Your participation in the e-CHUG is voluntary. You may withdraw from participating at any time. Your answers on the e-CHUG are strictly confidential. Your name is not attached to the form and no individual information is kept or provided to Oregon State University.

http://interwork.sdsu.edu/echug2/oregonstate

e-TOKE

Curious to test your knowledge about marijuana?
Want to learn more about marijuana use?
Want feedback on your use of marijuana compared to other Oregon State students?

Electronic THC Online Knowledge Experience (e-TOKE)

What is e-TOKE?

The e-TOKE (electronic THC Online Knowledge Experience) is an interactive web survey that is a brief marijuana-specific assessment and feedback tool for Oregon State University students. It provides insight into marijuana use, using personalized information about your behaviors and risk factors. The assessment takes about 10-15 minutes and is self-guided making it quick, anonymous, and flexible to fit your free time and location.

What does e-TOKE do?

The e-TOKE first asks for basic demographic information followed by typical pattern of use, time and money patterns, health related questions, and brief sections on alcohol and cigarette use. Once all information is entered e-TOKE will provide statistics and visuals for each set of questions. This includes short written summaries as well as graphs and statistical comparisons. All results are presented in a printable, easy-to-read format using tabs at the top of the page to move from section to section. Finally, there is an additional resource tab for students who may have further questions or concerns, including contacts for campus resources.

What do I need to use the e-TOKE?

  • A computer
  • Internet access
  • A JavaScript enabled Internet browser
  • About 8-10 minutes
  • A printer (to print the feedback)

If you find after taking the e-TOKE that you would like to discuss your results with a staff member at Student Health Services, please call 541-737-7552 to request an appointment.

Your participation in the e-TOKE is voluntary. You may withdraw from participating at any time. Your answers on the e-TOKE are strictly confidential. Your name is not attached to the form and no individual information is kept or provided to Oregon State University.

http://interwork.sdsu.edu/echeckup/usa/mj/coll/oregonstate

Presentations for Fraternities and Sororities

Wondering if your chapter needs a program? For an up-to-date list of alcohol workshops presented to chapters, go to the Greek Chapters Outreach Spreadsheet.

In order to schedule a workshop about alcohol use or other prevention-related topics for your chapter, please complete the online Program Request Form.

If you have questions, please email robert.reff@oregonstate.edu.

IMPACT

IMPACT is an evidence-based program designed for OSU students to engage in a focused and meaningful discussion about alcohol or marijuana substance use. During your IMPACT session, not only will you be provided with personalized feedback regarding your use but also a variety of harm-reduction strategies to help encourage social responsibility and personal safety.

IMPACT programs are made available to all students, but may be required for those students who have been sanctioned by the Residence Hall system, Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, Corvallis Municipal Court, the Benton County Circuit Court, the City Attorney's Office, or other off-campus referral sources.

When sanctioned, there is a mandatory $175 fee to complete IMPACT. This fee contributes to the cost of facilitating the IMPACT program and employing graduate assistants within Prevention, Advocacy, and Wellness at Student Health Services.

For students who are required by a court to receive an evaluation from a certified professional for that alcohol and/or drug use, the IMPACT program is able to provide students with evolutions from a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). There will be a mandatory $175 IMPACT fee and a $78 fee for each required follow-up appointment with the CADC. *Students who are required to have an evaluation should follow Direction Set #4.

Please select the scenario which best fits your situation and then follow the corresponding direction set:

1.       This is my first IMPACT Alcohol sanction

Follow Directions #1

2.       This is my first IMPACT Marijuana sanction

Follow Directions #2

3.       This is my second (or more) IMPACT sanction for alcohol and/or marijuana

Follow Directions #3

4.       I have been sanctioned to see the CADC directly

Follow Directions #4

If you have any questions please contact us at impact@oregonstate.edu

NOTE: You must use your ONID email for correspondence with IMPACT staff. Failure to use your ONID email may result in IMPACT staff not receiving your email.

If you wish to take an IMPACT class but have not been required to take it as part of a University or Court mandated sanction, please contact us at impact@oregonstate.edu


 

 

This is my first IMPACT Alcohol sanction

Directions #1:

If you have been sanctioned to complete IMPACT Alcohol or IMPACT Marijuana, you can expect to attend at least two sessions that are approximately two hours each. Since our program strives to address the needs of the individual, some students may need to meet with the CADC or have a One-on-One session with IMPACT staff before attending these two sessions. 

Please see below for registration instructions:

1. Complete the Intake Survey

NOTE: Survey takes approximately 30 minutes. The survey must be completed in one sitting.

2. Register for the next available Alcohol Session #1. You will be automatically enrolled in Session #2.

NOTE: Some students may be required to meet with the CADC or complete a One-on-One Appointment prior to taking the class. Please follow the directions sent to you after you complete the Initial Enrollment Survey.

3. Attend your scheduled Session #1 class. Payment will be discussed in class.

4. Attend Session #2 exactly one week later at the same time and place as Session #1.

5. Upon completion, confirm that your IMPACT instructor has the correct information regarding who to notify of your completion (i.e. UHDS, Conduct, Corvallis Court, etc.)

6. Give your referral agent your Completion certificate

NOTE: It is your responsibility to notify your referral agent that you have successfully completed IMPACT. 

7. Complete the 30-Day and 60-Day Follow-up Surveys 

Click HERE to start the intake survey


 

This is my first IMPACT Marijuana sanction

Directions #2:

If you have been sanctioned to complete IMPACT Alcohol or IMPACT Marijuana, you can expect to attend at least two sessions that are approximately two hours each. Since our program strives to address the needs of the individual, some students may need to meet with the CADC or have a One-on-One session with IMPACT staff before attending these two sessions. 

Please see below for registration instructions.

1. Complete the Intake Survey

NOTE: Survey takes approximately 30 minutes. The survey must be completed in one sitting.

2. Register for the next available Alcohol Session #1. You will be automatically enrolled in Session #2.

NOTE: Some students may be required to meet with the CADC or complete a One-on-One Appointment prior to taking the class. Please follow the directions sent to you after you complete the Initial Enrollment Survey. 

3. Attend your scheduled Session #1 class. Payment will be discussed in class.

4. Attend Session #2 exactly one week later at the same time and place as Session #1. 

5. Upon completion, confirm that your IMPACT instructor has the correct information regarding who to notify of your completion (i.e. UHDS, Conduct, Corvallis Court, etc.)

6. Give your referral agent your Completion certificate

NOTE: It is your responsibility to notify your referral agent that you have successfully completed IMPACT. 

7. Complete the 30-Day and 60-Day Follow-up Surveys 

Click HERE to start the intake survey


 

This is my second (or more) IMPACT sanction for alcohol and/or marijuana

Directions #3:

If you have taken IMPACT previously, please email our staff at impact@oregonstate.edu in order to receive instructions and your link to the Intake Survey. 



 

I have been sanctioned to see the CADC directly

Directions #4:

If you have been sanctioned to meet with the Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) please see below for registration instructions.

1. Complete the Intake Survey

NOTE: Survey takes approximately 30 minutes. The survey must be completed in one sitting. Also, You must click the CADC survey link on the next page.

2. Once you complete the Intake Survey please call, Student Health Services at 541-737-9355, or schedule in-person at Plageman Building 2nd floor at the front desk and ask to schedule with the CADC. The initial CADC appointment can take 60-90 minutes and you are asked to arrive 15 minutes early.

NOTE: Please notify your referral agent (i.e. UHDS, Student Conduct, Corvallis Municipal, Benton County Circuit Court, Athletics, etc.) of your scheduled appointment with the CADC and continue to keep them informed on your progress.

Click HERE to start the intake survey

Collegiate Recovery Community

~ Student Success Built on Sobriety ~
More than 23,500 combined days of sobriety

About the CRC Why CRCs Work Get Involved in CRC Become a CRC Member CRC Services and Resources

CRC Clubhouse is open in Dixon Lodge

The CRC Clubhouse is located in Dixon Lodge, on SW Jefferson and 11th. Access is from the east side of the building via the glass door facing into the quad.

For students, staff/faculty, or community members who are interested in becoming a member or learning more about the CRC, the Clubhouse is open for public coffee hours at various times throughout the week. For current coffee hours, please refer to the the sidebar on this page.

Recovery Specific Housing at OSU 

>> Frequently Asked Questions (PDF)

For many students leaving home for the first time, college is a place to live and learn independently. For some students, this transition involves high-risk drinking and drug use. Some students will decide that they need to abstain from alcohol or other drug use because of issues with addiction, while others will start their time at college already actively maintaining a sober life. Attitudes towards addiction and alcoholism among college students are unsupportive at best, and stigmatizing at worst. For example, a 22-year-old student was quoted as saying to one of his sober friends “You can’t say someone is an alcoholic until they leave college. Everyone drinks in college….” This quote shows the lack of understanding about addiction in general on campus. Furthermore, the college party environment is potentially dangerous for college students who have been in recovery from alcohol or drug addiction. The challenge for these students is how to maintain their sobriety and success in school, and still feel as if they are a member of the college community.

Oregon State University has taken steps toward meeting the needs of students in recovery from drug or alcohol addictions. OSU launched a collegiate recovery community in the fall of 2013. Opportunities for students to engage in fun, supportive, and sober activities has been made possible by support from the OSU Beverage Partnership funded by Pepsi. In the fall of 2014, the program expanded to include a collegiate recovery community housing option in partnership with University Housing and Dining Services.

The Collegiate Recovery Community meets the needs of students in recovery by providing a private space, support and funding for events, meetings, studying, or just hanging out with other sober friends. The community also provides funding for sober activities on and off campus. “The sober students have a tight bond, we look out for each other, we are available for our friends in recovery 24/7, no matter what,” said a student in recovery. By providing the space, funding, and resources, sober students not only support each other, but now also have the same opportunities for fun and success on a university campus as other students, in a sober environment.

What is a Collegiate Recovery Community?

The OSU Collegiate Recovery Community (CRC) provides a nurturing environment in which students recovering from addiction can obtain recovery support while working towards their collegiate goals. Students participating in this community are presented with opportunities that offer long-term academic and career growth. With opportunities to expand their social and professional networks and by participating in group activities and events, students are supported in their decision to live a life centered on recovery. This also encourages academic improvement and helps to build positive life skills. Through this holistic approach, the CRC helps to provide a normative college experience for students in recovery.

About the CRC

About the CRC Why CRCs Work Get Involved in CRC Become a CRC Member CRC Services and Resources

 Recovery Specific Housing at OSU

 Mission Statement

The mission of the Collegiate Recovery Community is to provide engaging and understanding support to Oregon State University students in recovery or who are contemplating entering into recovery. Our recovery community is rooted in the belief that no student should feel alone and that every student should receive the support they need, in the way they need it, from the people that they find most comfortable. We are here to support the individual student's efforts in their recovery, academics, and continued success through strong and responsive recovery support. Our doors are open to anyone who is looking for support.

Values

 The values of the Collegiate Recovery Community are defined by the members and reflect what they believe is important for a recovery support program.

 These values are the core beliefs of our program and are what help us attain our mission. Our values define our culture and our community.

 The FAMILY that you choose: The CRC considers all of its members as part of its family. We are invested in supporting each other in our journey in sobriety. We are a unified community that holds one another accountable for remaining true to the community's cause and the individual member's stated values.

  Acceptance : Our community is built on the trust each once of us has that we all will treat one another with respect. We are committed to remain open to new and different paths to recovery and will not judge others for their approach. Our community is a safe space, and it is also place to be brave when we are ready. We are committed to sustaining this environment.

  Nourishment : As a community we recognize that individuals in recovery will flourish when the mind, body, and soul are nurtured. Our community commits to partnering with campus and community organizations to create programs that will strengthen our member's recovery and ability to succeed as students at OSU.

Goals

1 .) Create holistic and responsive support for students in recovery from addiction. This support will take the shape of a unified community that not only strengthens a student's sobriety, but also supports their success as students, leaders, and community members at Oregon State University.

2.) Ensure that both prospective students and students already on OSU's campus are aware of the Collegiate Recovery Community and the benefits it offers, as well as viewing all of OSU as a recovery-supportive home.

3.) Reducing stigma associated with addiction and recovery by expanding and enhancing existing campus wide dialogue around these issues, including increasing the normalization of the sober student experience.

What is the Collegiate Recovery Community?

The OSU Collegiate Recovery Community (CRC) provides a nurturing environment in which students recovering from addiction can obtain recovery support while working towards their collegiate goals. Students participating in this community are presented with opportunities that offer long-term academic and career growth. With opportunities to expand their social and professional networks, and by participating in group activities and events, students are supported in their decision to live a life centered on recovery. This also encourages academic improvement and helps to build positive life skills. Through this holistic approach, the CRC helps to provide a normative college experience for students in recovery.

The CRC provides the following to all its members and residents:

  • A 24/7 Clubhouse space with:
    • Recovery-oriented meetings
    • Study space
    • Lounge
    • Kitchen with refrigerator, microwave, sink, and water cooler
    • Coffee/tea
    • Safe, sober place for members to go
    • Locker space
  • 24/7 support from other members, as well as community staff
  • Academic advising
  • Sober events and gatherings
  • A tight-knit fellowship of sober students in recovery

What the Collegiate Recovery Community IS NOT

The CRC is NOT a treatment facility. We do not provide residential nor outpatient treatment services. We do not work with government programming such as drug court, probation, or parole. We are not a halfway house. We provide support to students at OSU who have been in recovery for a minimum of three months, and desire to continue to live sober. Please see above for a list of the services and support we do offer.

CRC Advisory Board

Upon inception in September 2012, the advisory board sought to create and implement a plan for a CRC on Oregon State’s campus. The advisory board created a vision for OSU’s Collegiate Recovery Community, to best meet the unique needs of our student body. The community was inspired by different aspects of recovery community programs at the University of Vermont, Augsberg College, Texas Tech University, and Rutgers University.

Board Members

  • Susie Brubaker-Cole – Vice Provost of Student Affairs
  • Sara Caldwell-Kan – Peer Health Implementation Specialist
  • Karen Chrisman – Referral Coordinator, Student Health Services
  • Norene Collins – Print Procurement Specialist, OSU Printing and Mailing
  • Karen Elliott – Instructor/Undergraduate Internship Coordinator, College of Public Health and Human Sciences
  • Gerry Frank – UHDS Inventory and Asset Manager
  • Jim Gouveia – Counselor, Counseling and Psychological Services
  • Jenny Haubenreiser – Executive Director, Student Health Services
  • Michael Henthorne – Director, Memorial Union
  • Michelle Inderbitzen – Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
  • Alex Matiash – Resident Director of McNary Hall, University Housing and Dining Services
  • Robert Reff – Director of Alcohol, Drug and Violence Prevention Center, Student Health Services
  • Raphelle Rhoads – Coordinator of Community Conduct, Student Conduct and Community Standards
  • Larry Roper – OSU Faculty
  • John Ruyak – Alcohol, Drug and Recovery Specialist, Student Health Services
  • Cathy Sullivan – Fitness Services and Education Coordinator, Department of Recreational Services
  • Ellen Topnes – Staff Counselor, Counseling and Psychological Services

Grant Information

Special thanks to the Stacie Mathewson Foundation as well as the Pepsi Beverage Partnership at OSU.

Why CRCs Work

About the CRC Why CRCs Work Get Involved in CRC Become a CRC Member CRC Services and Resources

Recovery Specific Housing at OSU

Collegiate Recovery Communities have been in existence for more than 25 years. Staff, faculty, and alumni speak of the positive impact of these programs. It is only recently that researchers have begun to quantify the effects of these programs.

Need

Between 1994 and 2004, the number of adolescents seeking substance abuse treatment in the United States has increased by 65 percent (Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration, 2004) and would appear to be continuing on a similar trajectory. Consequently, there is a growing population of individuals in recovery seeking college degrees. College may be challenging for someone who has recently become abstinent from alcohol and drugs and has entered recovery. In addition to the normal struggles with coursework, living away from home, relationship issues, and working on their recovery program, these students also have to contend with the college environment, which is often unofficially organized around alcohol and other drug use. (Wechsler, Davenport, Dowdall, Moeykens, & Castillo, 1994). Simply put, the college environment is not a recovery-supportive environment.

The Collegiate Recovery Community offers an alternative. It provides a supportive environment within the campus culture that reinforces the decision to disengage from addictive behaviors. It provides a community of peers with shared experiences, goals, and values around recovery. It offers an educational opportunity alongside recovery support to ensure that students do not have to sacrifice one for the other. It reinforces accountability for recovering students that comes from self, peers, and higher education staff. And finally, it provides a normative college experience for individuals in recovery apart from the culture of drinking and substance use that is present on today’s campuses.

Research

Alexandre B. Laudet received funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to research CRCs and the impact on students. The data below summarizes students in 26 different recovery programs in the United States.

Relapse

CRCs that participated in the study had an average length of sobriety of 16 months. The range of sobriety was between 1 month and 16.7 years. The mean percent of students relapsing was approximately 8 percent. This is impressive, given that the average relapse rate during the first year of sobriety for individuals can be as high as 90 percent, depending on the study.

Academic Success, Retention, and Graduation

Students active in CRCs demonstrate higher GPAs, better retention, and graduation rates. These students succeed in the classroom and add to the campus.

CRC GPAs and Retention Rates

Get Involved in CRC

About the CRC Why CRCs Work Get Involved in CRC Become a CRC Member CRC Services and Resources

Recovery Specific Housing at OSU

Contact Information

Email: recovery@oregonstate.edu

Robert Reff, Director of Alcohol, Drug and Violence Prevention Center
Email: robert.reff@oregonstate.edu
Phone: 541-737-7564

John Ruyak, Alcohol, Drug, and Recovery Specialist
Email: john.ruyak@oregonstate.edu
Phone: 541-737-1184

How to Join

I am in recovery and interested in joining.

If you are a current or prospective student at OSU in recovery, we invite you to become a member of our community. Please see Become a CRC Member for admissions guidelines and requirements for membership to the CRC.

I am not in recovery, but I want to get involved.

We welcome students with an interest in recovery and a desire to reduce the stigma surrounding those affected by addiction. To find out more about how you can support the CRC, please send an email to recovery@oregonstate.edu, or contact John Ruyak at john.ruyak@oregonstate.edu.

Become a CRC Member

About the CRC Why CRCs Work Get Involved in CRC Become a CRC Member CRC Services and Resources

Recovery Specific Housing at OSU

Newcomer

Newcomers are students who may be new to or contemplating recovery, and would like to participate in the CRC. Newcomers meet the following criteria:

  • Currently enrolled at OSU
  • Demonstrate a strong desire to stay sober
  • Maintain sobriety at all CRC programs

Newcomers have access to the Clubhouse during open CRC events/meetings. For students interested in becoming members or learning more about the CRC, the Clubhouse (McNary Hall, Room 125) will be open to the public for free coffee hours. Please see the side bar on this page for updated times.

Email recovery@oregonstate.edu for a list of upcoming events or to talk to someone about getting involved.

Provisional Member

Provisional Members are students who are early in their recovery and have shown an interest in joining the CRC. Provisional Members must meet the following criteria:

  • Currently enrolled at OSU
  • Be currently committed to remaining alcohol and drug free
  • Have shown an interest in the CRC by attending at least 3 qualifying events
  • Have satisfied the CRC admissions requirements (see below)
  • Follow the Provisional Membership Agreement (PDF)

Benefits of provisional membership include:

  • Access to the Clubhouse Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5 pm
  • Access to all CRC programming and meetings
  • Opportunity to participate in CRC governance/leadership
  • Opportunity to participate in resources training
  • Option to use clubhouse when full members are present
  • Opportunity to gain 24/7 access to the Clubhouse once 90 days of sobriety is achieved

*students interested in exploring provisional membership should send an email recovery@oregonstate.edu

Member

Members are students currently in recovery who have been sober for a minimum of 3 months. Members must meet the following criteria:

  • Currently enrolled at OSU
  • Have at least 3 months sobriety
  • Have satisfied the CRC admissions requirements (see below)
  • Follow the Membership Agreement (PDF)

Benefits of membership include:

  • 24/7 access to the Clubhouse
  • Access to all CRC programming and meetings
  • Opportunity to become a mentor
  • Opportunity to participate in CRC governance/leadership
  • Opportunity to participate in resources training/become a trainer for Newcomers/Members

Resident

Residents are CRC members that wish to reside on campus in a confidential, recovery-supported living area designated for CRC members and programming. Residents must meet the same criteria as members, including completion of the membership admissions requirements (see below) in order to be considered for CRC housing.

Admissions Requirements

Students interested in becoming a member and/or resident must complete the following steps as part of the CRC admissions process:

CRC Services and Resources

About the CRC Why CRCs Work Get Involved in CRC Become a CRC Member CRC Services and Resources

Recovery Specific Housing at OSU

Programming

Involvement in the Collegiate Recovery Community provides the opportunity to take part in many recreational events and activities in addition to skill-building and other educational programs, ongoing throughout the academic year. These include weekly meetings, movie nights, camping trips, barbecues, personal/professional development seminars, Adventure Leadership retreats through the Department of Recreational Sports, and more. A unique aspect of the CRC program is the opportunity for its members to provide/receive mentorship to/from their peers in recovery, as a source of understanding and support during the recovery process. Mentorship and fellowship are some of the most-cited, most-studied practices for people in recovery, and are linked to longer periods of sobriety.

The Clubhouse

The CRC Clubhouse is located in McNary Hall, Room 125. Access is from the north side of the building, on Southwest Jefferson. Entrance is a glass door by the bike racks. Look for a sign that says "Oregon State CRC Clubhouse." (You cannot access the CRC Clubhouse from within McNary Hall.)

CRC members have access to the Clubhouse to study, drink coffee, socialize, or just hang out – 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It also serves as a private venue in which scheduled meetings and other CRC programming are held. All members are asked to follow the Clubhouse rules (PDF).

For students interested in becoming members or learning more about the CRC, the Clubhouse will be open to the public for free coffee hours Mondays 1-2 p.m., Tuesdays 10-11 a.m., Wednesdays 2-3 p.m., and Thursdays 11 a.m.-12 p.m. throughout Winter Term 2016.

The CRC Clubhouse in McNary 125 is available for recovery-supportive meetings and events. If you are interested in reserving the space, please complete the online reservation request form. All reservations are subject to the Clubhouse reservation agreement (PDF).

After you submit the form, a CRC staff member will contact you about your request.

Campus Resources

External Resources

Local Support

Other Resources

Survey Data

OSU has had a long commitment to gathering health behavior data related to alcohol and other drug use and its consequences. Currently, there are no broad-based screenings done for employees to determine the level of use by these groups. Since 2000 Student Health Services has participated biennially in the National College Health Assessment (NCHA, revised in 2010 to become NCHA II). During Spring Term 2014 the NCHA II was administered and data are available from that survey. The overall student response rate for the 2014 NCHA II at OSU was 93.1% with 1,796 respondents. OSU data from the previous survey are shown for comparison. The NCHA allows for reporting estimated number of drinks consumed by OSU students and an estimate of the blood alcohol level (BAL) that students obtained as compared to national averages.

 Table 1. 2014 ACHA-NCHA Data for Frequency

Frequency of Use OSU 2012 (%) OSU 2014 (%) National 2014 (%)
Never used alcohol 17.3 19.1 20.6
Used, but not in the last 30 days 11.3 10.8 13.4
1-9 times (in a 30-day period) 46.5 49.5 50.7
10+ times (in a 30-day period) 24.9 20.6 15.3

Table 2. 2014 ACHA-NCHA Data for High-Risk Alcohol Use

High-risk use is defined as five or more drinks in a single sitting over the past two weeks.
Historical chart regarding high-risk alcohol use compared to national sample from 2002- 2014 (PDF)

Variable (excludes non-drinkers) OSU 2012 (%) OSU 2014 (%) National 2014 (%)
High risk - men 50.4 47.3 44.0
High risk - women 38.9 35.3 31.0
High risk  - total
45.0 40.0 36.1

Table 3. 2014 ACHA-NCHA Data for BAL Measures

Variable (excludes non-drinkers) OSU 2012 OSU 2014 National 2014
Avg. # of drinks “last time partied” - men 7.01 6.98 6.48
Avg. # of drinks “last time partied” - women 4.92 4.51 4.26
Avg. # of drinks “last time partied” - total
6.00 5.58 5.01
Blood Alcohol Level - men 0.08 .08 0.08
Blood Alcohol Level - women 0.10 .08 0.08
Blood Alcohol Level - total
0.09 0.08 0.08

Table 4. 2014 OSU NCHA Data - Frequency Use/Negative Consequences

Frequency of Negative Consequences (students who drank alcohol in the last 12 months; non-drinkers excluded)

OSU 2012 (%) OSU 2014 (%) National 2014 (%)
Doing something later regretted 43.8 40.3 38.2
Forgetting where they were/what done (black-out) 42.8 36.7 34.5
Physically injured yourself 20.9 18.6 16.3
Unprotected sex 25.2 21.9 21.3
Physically injured another person 3.6 2.0 2.0
Someone had sex with you without getting your consent 2.8 2.0 2.4
Had sex with someone without getting their consent 1.1 0.4 0.6
Got in trouble with the police 7.1 3.8 3.3
Seriously considered suicide 2.2 1.3 2.7

In addition to understanding negative consequences, it is important to determine the level at which OSU students are engaging in behaviors that may reduce or limit the risk/harm that can come from excessive alcohol use. Information on harm-reduction behaviors is presented (Table 5) as a way to determine areas where more education could occur and to determine if our students have used any means of protecting themselves from possible alcohol-related harm.

Table 5. 2014 OSU NCHA Data - Harm Reduction Behaviors

Behavior (non-drinkers excluded)

OSU 2012 (%) OSU 2014 (%) National 2014 (%)
Alternate non-alcoholic with alcoholic beverages 26.4 31.0 31.6
Determine in advance not to exceed a set number of drinks 32.3 36.0 38.8
Choose not to drink alcohol 18.8 19.6 23.2
Use a designated driver 77.6 81.4 86.0
Eat before and/or during drinking 76.8 79.6 79.3
Have a friend let you know when you have had enough 32.8 35.9 37.1
Keep track of how many drinks being consumed 56.0 60.0 64.6
Pace drinks to one or fewer an hour 21.8 24.4 27.2
Avoid drinking games 22.5 26.1 32.4
Stay with same group of friends the entire time drinking 78.1 81.7 83.4
Stick with only one kind of alcohol when drinking 38.9 39.8 45.8
Reported one or more of the above strategies 95.5 96.7 97.5

More than 96 percent of OSU students who drink report using at least one harm reduction strategy to stay safer if they choose to drink.

Alcohol and Other Drug Work/Advisory Group

Purpose

The high-risk use of alcohol and other drugs at Oregon State University has a direct impact on the ability of our students to be academically and personally successful.  Based on data from our 2012 National College Health Assessment (NCHA), OSU students are engaging in greater rates of high-risk drinking (45 percent) versus the national average (34 percent).

As a land grant university with an access mission, with a focus on increasing persistence, retention, and graduation rates, and with an eye to contributing to initiatives to support our students’ ability to successfully navigate the OSU collegiate environment, we recognize how high-risk alcohol and drug use can undermine those goals and impede the ability of all students to be successful.  We believe that students, faculty, staff, and community members actively utilizing research-based practices will result in the reduction of high-risk alcohol and drug use and subsequently increase the ability of our students to be healthier, more engaged, and more successful in school, life, and future careers.

Mission

The Alcohol and Other Drugs Work/Advisory Group (AODWAG) strives to improve the health, safety, and academic success of Oregon State University students by fostering an environment that encourages healthy decision making regarding alcohol and other drug use through student centric, data driven practices.

Membership

Membership on the AODWAG will consist of two groups, the Core Team and the Stakeholders Team.

Facilitators

Robert C. Reff, Ph.D.
Director, Prevention and Health Promotion
Student Health Services
robert.reff@oregonstate.edu
541-737-7564

Jill Childress
Student Conduct and Community Standards
University Housing and Dining Services
jill.childress@oregonstate.edu
541-737-8734

Core Team (meets regularly)

In order to advance the mission of the AODWAG, the membership needs to be small and consist of individuals whose positions on campus relate to the prevention of harmful alcohol and drug use on our campus. Core Team will meet monthly throughout the year to carry out the essential functions of the AODWAG.  Members of the Core Team will represent the following departments:

  • Athletics
  • Center for Fraternity and Sorority Life
  • Community Outreach (when hired)
  • Counseling and Psychological Services
  • Department of Public Safety
  • Oregon State Police
  • Student Conduct and Community Standards
  • Student Health Services
  • University Housing and Dining Services

Stakeholders Team (meets twice annually)

The AODWAG takes an environmental approach to preventing harmful use of alcohol and other drugs.  It is essential to have broad stakeholders input, data sharing, and goal setting for this work to be successful.  The Stakeholders Team and Core Team will meet twice an academic year.  The Stakeholders Team consists of individuals from the following offices (this is a non-exhaustive list):

  • Benton County
  • Counseling and Psychological Services
  • Corvallis Police Department
  • Corvallis Fire Department
  • Office of the Dean of Student Life
  • Healthy Campus Initiatives
  • Human Services Resource Center
  • Athletics
  • Will Bauscher – EMT
  • ASOSU
  • Interfraternity Council
  • Panhellenic Council
  • Memorial Union
  • The Office of Student Affairs Research and Evaluation
  • Associate Provost for Academic Success and Engagement
  • Office of Equity and Inclusion
  • Others to be determined as needed/identified

Contact for the Core Team

AODWAG@oregonstate.edu

Alcohol Resources

Interested in making safer decisions about drinking alcohol?

On-Campus Resources

Student Health Services
Prevention, Advocacy and Wellness
Robert Reff, Director
Email: robert.reff@oregonstate.edu
541-737-7564

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
Snell Hall 5th floor
541-737-2131
counseling.oregonstate.edu

Off-Campus Resources

Statewide/Regional

Corvallis

Website Resources

Violence Prevention

It's On Us logoWARNING! Your Internet activity can be tracked. If the person who is harming you has access to your computer, please consider using a more secure computer such as at the library.

If you need immediate assistance, call 9-1-1.

For more information regarding violence awareness and prevention, contact:

Michelle Bangen, MPH, CHES
Associate Director for Prevention & Wellness
Student Health Services
violenceprevention@oregonstate.edu
541-737-7880

Request a workshop:

To request a presentation for your group, class, or organization, please complete the Program Request Form.


To contact the OSU Survivor Advocacy and Resource Center 24/7, call 541-737-2030.

For more information on Oregon State University's commitment and efforts to support survivors, please visit leadership.oregonstate.edu/survivor-support.

Workshops

The Wellness team at Student Health Services is dedicated to educating students and to providing information regarding a wide variety of health issues. Below are descriptions of the various workshop topics that are covered by Wellness. If you would like to have someone from the Wellness team come to your location (residence hall, community, class, etc.) to give a presentation, facilitate a discussion, or provide health education materials, please complete the online Program Request Form. For preparation and planning purposes, please make your request at least two weeks in advance.

Alcohol, Marijuana and Other Drugs

Alcohol and Other Drugs

This program focuses on helping students identify negative and harmful consequences of high-risk alcohol use. It acknowledges that abstinence from alcohol is the safest option but not always the most acceptable choice for students. Thus, the program focuses on harm reduction as opposed to a "just say no" approach. The presenters approach this topic in a fun, interactive, positive, and intellectually stimulating manner.

Marijuana: A Blunt Discussion on the Facts

Want to make sure you understand the Oregon State and Corvallis laws on marijuana? Want to see just how many students on OSU's campus are using marijuana? Want to learn how marijuana affects your body and your studies? Then join us for this interactive presentation to get you in the know regarding marijuana.

Nutrition

Nutrition: Body Image

This program discusses body image, self-esteem and the media’s influence on how we feel about ourselves. Students will leave with a more positive feeling about themselves and their bodies, as well as learning about other campus resources related to eating disorders and body image.

Nutrition: Healthy Eating on a Budget

Want to eat healthy but always feel like money is a stretch? We will discuss ways to get more from your dollar, along with budgeting basics and helpful tips for navigating the grocery store on a budget.

Recovery

Recovery: Addressing Stigma and Making OSU a Recovery Supportive Home

This workshop will use clips from the documentary "The Anonymous People" to prompt a discussion about what it is like for someone who is in recovery from addiction to be a student on a university campus. Students will be encouraged to think about the stigma that is placed on those who face addiction or who are in recovery. Students will discuss the ways a typical campus can be a hostile environment to those facing addiction or who are in recovery, as well as explore the resources for addiction and recovery support on OSU’s campus and will be empowered to be an advocate for increasing this support.

Sexual Health

Sexual Health: Beyond Birds and Bees

This interactive workshop brings everyone up to speed on what it means to have safer sex. Through inclusive activities and discussion, participants will explore what safer sex is and what it means for them. Participants will learn to dispel common myths about sex and sexuality and feel more prepared to protect themselves and their partners. STI testing and other campus resources will be shared.

Violence Prevention

Sexual Violence Prevention: Clothing Optional. Consent Required.

Learn about sexual consent, why you need it, and how to make it hot. This interactive session will promote an honest discussion about consent and communication within relationships through a variety of activities, exploring what it means to have enthusiastic consent.

Sexual Violence Prevention: Blurred Lines

Are you sure you know "they want it?" This interactive session will break down sexual consent – what it is, who can give it, and how to get it without coercion. Participants will also explore the perceived blurred line between bad sex versus sexual assault.

Sexual Violence Prevention: Beavers Give a Dam

This is an interactive, engaging bystander intervention program to prevent sexual violence. The program is evidence-based and customizable for various communities. Students who participate in "Beavers Give A Dam" will...

    • Recognize different types of sexual violence.
    • Explore the relationship between sexual violence and alcohol and other drugs.
    • Understand sexual consent and when it can be given/received.
    • Define the bystander effect and bystander intervention.
    • Practice bystander intervention methods.
    • Know and be able to reference campus and local resources for sexual violence survivors.

Advocacy - Violence Prevention

You’ve Got a Friend (How to Support a Survivor)

This workshop will discuss sexual violence dynamics, the body’s response to trauma, sexual violence misconceptions (rape myths), and the university response to sexual violence. We recognize that a survivor needs to experience a compassionate and non-judgmental response upon their disclosure that avoids any comments that can be interpreted as victim-blaming. This workshop will teach skills to create a caring and supportive environment for survivors.

Sexual Assault: Creating a Community of Care

This workshop/training provides trauma-informed, survivor-centered information about the psychological and social impact of violence on individuals. It identifies common response patterns of the community and how to change our responses so that we consider the impact. It is intended to help the audience understand the varying responses of survivors so that we can create a community of care.

Creating a Meaningful Relationship through Trauma-Informed Listening

This workshop will provide skills in listening and communication that are sensitive to a trauma-informed approach to survivor response. It will identify those factors that contribute to having a meaningful, helping relationship. The workshop is intended for faculty, staff, and organizational leaders.