Health Alerts

Meningococcal disease alert

(Updated 03-02-2017)

An Oregon State undergraduate in Corvallis is being treated at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center for what has been confirmed as meningococcal disease. This is the third reported case of the B strain of meningococcal disease at Oregon State University over the past four months. 

Meningococcal disease is a serious, potentially fatal infection that most often causes severe swelling of the tissue around the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) or a serious blood infection (meningococcemia). The best defense is getting vaccinated.

Symptoms of Meningococcal disease

Early symptoms may be difficult to distinguish from the flu or an upper respiratory infection, or symptoms may appear suddenly and progress rapidly.

  • Fever and/or shaking chills
  • Headache
  • Stiff neck
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Severe aches and pains
  • Rash
  • Rapid breathing
  • Weakness
  • Confusion

If symptoms occur

Immediately contact your health care provider or go to the emergency department for sudden severe symptoms.

How Meningococcal disease spreads

The bacteria are spread by exchanging respiratory and throat secretions (saliva or spit) during close (for example, coughing or kissing) or lengthy contact with an infected person.

Other factors that increase risk: 

  • first-year college students living in residence halls
  • college students age 25 and under living in group settings (such as fraternities and sororities)
  • military recruits
  • those who lack a spleen or have certain immune disorders.

How to reduce the spread of Meningococcal disease

  • Get vaccinated
  • Do not share:
    • drinking containers
    • eating utensils
    • toothbrushes
    • cosmetics
    • smoking devices
  • Do not drink out of a common source such as a punch bowl
  • Cover coughs and sneezes
  • Know that kissing poses a risk
  • Wash and sanitize your hands often
  • Know that smoking increases your risk

Vaccines available at Student Health

Student Health Services has vaccinations to cover all serotypes (strains) of meningococcus. The mandated meningococcal vaccine required at Oregon State University protects against groups A, C, W and Y. This vaccine does not cover against group B, the strain that has infected three OSU students since fall term 2016.  The MenB vaccine is available at Student Health Services.

Students currently enrolled may come to Student Health Services to receive a vaccine. Students should check with their insurance company to see if the cost will be covered. The charges can also be billed to students’ accounts. 

 


Influenza Information

(Updated 01-25-17)

We often see an increase Influenza(Flu) on campus during Winter Term. The best way to prevent Influenza is by getting vaccinated. Influenza vaccine is available at Student Health Services. The following is information from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) regarding Influenza.

What is Influenza (also called Flu)?

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccine each year.

Signs and Symptoms of Flu

People who have the flu often feel some or all of these signs and symptoms:

  • Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (very tired)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

*It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.

How Flu Spreads

Most experts believe that flu viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby. Less often, a person might also get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, eyes or possibly their nose.

Period of Contagiousness

You may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. It is important to stay away from work, classes and other public areas as much as possible when you have symptoms of influenza to prevent spreading the illness to others.

Onset of Symptoms

The time from when a person is exposed to flu virus to when symptoms begin is about 1 to 4 days, with an average of about 2 days.

Complications of Flu

Complications of flu can include bacterial pneumonia, ear infections, sinus infections, dehydration, and worsening of chronic medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, asthma, or diabetes.

People at High Risk from Flu

Anyone can get the flu (even healthy people), and serious problems related to the flu can happen at any age, but some people are at high risk of developing serious flu-related complications if they get sick. This includes people 65 years and older, people of any age with certain chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease), pregnant women, and young children.

Preventing Flu

The first and most important step in preventing flu is to get a flu vaccination each year. CDC also recommends everyday preventive actions (like staying away from people who are sick, covering coughs and sneezes and frequent handwashing) to help slow the spread of germs that cause respiratory (nose, throat, and lungs) illnesses, like flu.

Diagnosing Flu

It is very difficult to distinguish the flu from other viral or bacterial causes of respiratory illnesses on the basis of symptoms alone. There are tests available to diagnose flu. For more information, see Diagnosing Flu.

Treating

There are influenza antiviral drugs that can be used to treat flu illness.


Zika Virus Information

(Updated 02-10-17

Live updated information on Zika virus can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/zika/

Zika virus is spread to people primarily through mosquito bites. Only 1 out of 5 infected individuals will develop symptoms which include:

  • Fever
  • Rash
  • Joint pain
  • Conjunctivitis (red eyes).

Whether or not symptoms occur, all individuals with Zika infection can potentially spread it to others through sexual contact or blood transfusion. Zika is not spread through casual contact such as in a class room, between roommates who are not sexual partners, or through contaminated food.

Though the active infection only lasts for a few days, the potential for spread through sexual contact can last for months. So what’s the big concern? Zika virus can lead to serious birth defects if a pregnant woman develops an infection or if an infected woman later becomes pregnant and transmits it to her unborn fetus. 

If your partner traveled to an area with Zika

Zika virus can affect fetal brain development, and infected persons can carry this virus without showing symptoms. Because of these factors, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that people with a partner who traveled to an area with Zika  use condoms or avoid having sex for a period of time.

The precautionary period depends on whether the traveling partner is female or male:

  • If female: Use condoms or do not have sex for at least 8 weeks after her return from an area with Zika (if she doesn’t have symptoms), or for at least 8 weeks from the start of her symptoms (or Zika diagnosis) if she develops Zika.
  • If male: Use condoms or do not have sex for at least 6 months after his return from to an area with Zika (if he doesn’t have symptoms), or for at least 6 months from the start of his symptoms (or Zika diagnosis) if he develops Zika. This extended period is because Zika stays in semen longer than in other body fluids.

If you live in an area with Zika

If you live in an area with Zika it’s best to use condoms or avoid having sex.  If you (or your partner) develop symptoms of Zika or if you have concerns, talk to a healthcare provider.

The CDC recommends the following precautions to avoid exposure and complications: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/prevention/index.html

If you have recently traveled in affected areas and feel that you may have symptoms of Zika virus infection, contact Student Health Services for evaluation.

Meningococcal Update - 04/12/17

Updated 4-12-17

Oregon State University Corvallis students,

Last month more than 1,800 students received the type B meningococcal disease vaccination at clinics held on the Corvallis campus.  I am writing to let you know that follow-up vaccine clinics will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Monday, April 17, and Tuesday, April 18, in the lower-level ballroom of the Memorial Union.

If you received your first dose either at the March OSU clinic or at Student Health Services, it is imperative that you receive your follow-up dose. To achieve the best possible protection against this disease, you must receive all doses in the vaccine series and stay with the same brand for all doses of a vaccination series.

There are two brands of meningococcal B vaccine: Bexsero and Trumenba.  Most students who got their vaccine at Student Health Services or attended the OSU clinics in March received Bexsero. Some students started with Trumenba from another provider. Bexsero requires two doses that are given at least 30 days apart (you can get your second dose at any point after 30 days). Trumenba requires three doses over a six-month period of time. Both brands of vaccine will be available at the OSU clinics. Please call Student Health Services with any questions at 541-737-9355.

It is important that you bring these items to the upcoming clinic: your student identification; medical and pharmacy insurance information (in some cases these are separate cards); and previous meningococcal B vaccine information. Students who participated in the first OSU clinics should be in the system and should have a Get the Vax wallet card.

You are encouraged to attend the vaccine clinic regardless of insurance status or ability to pay*. OSU continues to work with health partners to address barriers to insurance coverage, and staff will be available at the clinics to assist students in navigating coverage options and maximizing benefits.

If you have not begun the meningococcal B vaccination series, it is not too late to start. If you are unable to attend the upcoming clinics, you can still receive the vaccines at Student Health Services, 108 S.W. Memorial Place, or at your own healthcare provider.

Please be aware of the symptoms of this meningococcal disease: high fever, stiff neck, rash, headaches, exhaustion, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If you exhibit any of these symptoms, seek immediate care at Student Health Services, which is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. or Saturday from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. After hours, immediately go to a nearby urgent care medical clinic or hospital emergency room.

More information about the disease is available by visiting Student Health Services or the Oregon Health Authority. If you have questions, please call the Student Health Services Nurse Advice Line at 541-737-2724.

Sincerely,

Susie Brubaker-Cole

Vice Provost

Student Affairs 

* Students without health insurance may be eligible for enrollment in the Oregon Health Plan. If you have questions or are interested in applying, please call the Health Navigator at 541-766-2130.


 3-17-17

To all OSU faculty and staff,

We are writing to inform you that more than 1,800 students were vaccinated last week against type B meningococcal disease at clinics held on the Oregon State University Corvallis campus. The mass vaccinations were necessary due to three cases of type B meningococcal disease involving OSU students within the past four months. Additionally, OSU Student Health Services already had administered about 650 vaccinations since last fall in addition to many more by local pharmacies and private physicians.

We continue to encourage vaccinations for students considered at highest risk for this disease. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, those at highest risk include students age 25 and younger who live in on-campus housing or are members of - or visit - fraternal living groups associated with the university.

Faculty and staff members are not considered to be within this risk group. Faculty and staff who are concerned about exposure to meningitis, or are interested in being vaccinated for meningococcal B disease, are encouraged to contact their primary care physician.

Students can still receive the vaccines at Student Health Services in Plageman Hall on campus, 108 S.W. Memorial Place, or call 541-737-9355. For those not yet vaccinated, the upcoming spring break provides an opportunity to visit personal medical providers for students who may be traveling home. 

At last week’s clinics, all students who received the vaccination were given wallet cards with vaccination details, such as the brand and potential side effects; and advised about follow-up steps that include clinics in mid- to late-April for the second dose required to ensure full effectiveness.

Health officials have recommended that all students be aware of the symptoms of this potentially fatal infection, which can include high fever, stiff neck, rash, headaches, exhaustion, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Anyone who exhibits these symptoms should immediately visit Student Health Services, which is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. For after-hour resources, immediately go to a nearby urgent care medical clinic or hospital emergency room.

While meningococcal disease is not highly contagious, it is transmitted through direct contact with droplets from coughing or sneezing; other discharges from the nose or throat; by sharing of eating and drinking utensils, smoking devices; or through intimate personal contact.

More information on meningococcal disease is available by calling the OSU Student Health Services Nurse Advice line at 541-737-2724 or Benton County Health Department communicable disease nurses at 541-766-6835 or by visiting these websites:

http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/infectious-diseases/meningococcal-disease

http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/Pages/disease.aspx?did=51

Sincerely,

Mike Green
Interim Vice President
Finance and Administration

Susie Brubaker-Cole
Vice Provost
Student Affairs

Steve Clark
Vice President
University Relations and Marketing


Note: The message from March 2 (see below) is also available in Spanish, Chinese and Arabic here.

March 6, 2017

To all Oregon State University Corvallis students,

Due to the third case of an OSU Corvallis student being diagnosed with meningococcal B disease in the past four months, the university is recommending that students at the highest risk receive meningococcal B vaccinations. 

Following the protocols of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the university is recommending meningococcal B vaccinations for all Oregon State undergraduate students who are age 25 or younger. In particular, OSU students who are age 25 or younger and who live in on-campus housing or who are members of – or who visit – fraternal living groups associated with the university are urged to act on this recommendation.

Students who are outside of these groups, and who are concerned about meningitis or are interested in learning more about vaccinations for meningococcal B disease, are encouraged to contact their primary care physician, Student Health Services or a nearby urgent medical center.

Vaccination Clinics

Vaccination clinics will be held from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, March 8, and Thursday, March 9, in McAlexander Field House. If students cannot participate in the clinics on March 8 and 9, they can also receive a vaccination at Student Health Services.

Vaccination Insurance

Before visiting the vaccination clinics, students (or their family members) are encouraged to contact their private insurance provider to verify insurance coverage for the vaccine. When speaking with your insurance representative, it is important to mention that OSU Corvallis campus has been designated an “outbreak” status by federal, state and county public health officials. 

Student Health Services (SHS) will be billing students’ insurance plans. Vaccinations for students who are on the Oregon Health Plan will be fully covered, as will vaccines for domestic and international students on OSU’s two sponsored plans (Aetna Student Health or Pacific Source).

Many private insurance plans will cover the cost of vaccines, including Kaiser and Providence. SHS is working to ensure as many plans as possible cover the cost of Meningococcal B vaccine at OSU. Again, it is important for students to contact their own insurance provider to verify coverage. SHS will assist international students and any others who have plans that do not cover the cost of vaccine if provided at OSU to receive the vaccine at an alternate location.

Students without insurance can receive the vaccination through benefits provided by the Oregon Health Plan or via other university resources. It is important that students not be discouraged from getting the vaccine due to their insurance status.

If you have questions about the OSU insurance plans, please contact OSU Student Health Services by calling541-737-4184. SHS staff will be at the clinic to assist with insurance questions as well. Please be sure to bring your insurance information with you to the clinic.

It is essential to receive all required vaccine doses

There are two commonly used brands of vaccine and both require multiple doses to be effective in preventing meningococcal B disease. It is very important that you receive the same brand for all doses:

  • Bexsero, which will be used at the OSU clinics and is the vaccine used at SHS, requires two doses with the second dose given at least one month following the first dose. The total cost of receiving two doses of the Bexsero vaccination for students through OSU Student Health Services is $364. Insurance will be billed for this expense.
  • Trumenba is another available brand and involves three doses. The second dose is provided one to two months after the initial dose. The third dose is provided six months after the initial dose. SHS carries this vaccine for students who started this series at another medical facility. The total cost for Trumenba through OSU Student Health Services is $405. Insurance will be billed for this expense.

Wellness & prevention are OSU's top priority

We understand that news of another student being diagnosed with meningococcal disease is very concerning.

Meningococcal disease is NOT highly contagious. Nevertheless, it is important to know about symptoms of meningitis and how the disease is contracted. The disease is transmitted only through direct contact with droplets from an ill person coughing or sneezing; discharges from the nose or throat; by sharing of eating and drinking utensils, smoking devices; and through intimate contact.

Symptoms of meningococcal disease include high fever, a stiff neck, a rash, headaches, exhaustion, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If you or someone you know exhibits these symptoms, you should immediately visit Student Health Services in Plageman Hall on campus at 108 S.W. Memorial Place or call 541-737-9355. Student Health Services is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. For after-hour resources, immediately go to a nearby urgent care medical clinic or hospital emergency room.

Additional information on meningococcal disease is available by calling the OSU Student Health Services Nurse Advice line at 541-737-2724 or Benton County Health Department communicable disease nurses at541-766-6835 or by visiting these websites:

http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/infectious-diseases/meningococcal-disease

http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/Pages/disease.aspx?did=51

Sincerely,

Mike Green                                    Susie Brubaker-Cole                       Steve Clark

Interim Vice President                       Vice Provost                                     Vice President

Finance and Administration               Student Affairs                                  University Relations

and Marketing 


 

March 2, 2017

Note: This message is also available in Spanish, Chinese and Arabic here.

An undergraduate student attending Oregon State University in Corvallis is being treated at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center for what has been confirmed as meningococcal disease. The student remains hospitalized in good condition.

This is the third reported case of the B strain of meningococcal disease at Oregon State over the past four months. Two other cases were reported in November 2016.

As a result of these three cases, the university will follow the protocols of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and recommend meningococcal B vaccinations for students who are at the highest risk. This vaccination program will be offered in cooperation with OSU Student Health Services, Benton County Health Department, the Oregon Health Authority and other health care partners. In accordance with CDC guidance, vaccination is recommended for all Oregon State undergraduate students under the age of 25. In particular, OSU students who are under the age of 25 and who live in on-campus housing or who are members of – or who visit – fraternal living groups associated with the university are urged to act on this recommendation.

News of this matter is concerning for all of us in the OSU community. While this is a serious matter, it is not an emergency. The university and its health care partners will address this matter effectively with the health and wellness of the Oregon State community as our top priority.

The county health department is working with OSU officials, local medical providers and state public health officials to identify anyone who may have had enough close exposure to the ill student to require preventive antibiotic treatment. As of today, more than 40 individuals have received preventive treatment. Since the disease is not easily spread from one person to another, county health officials are confident that they have identified and treated all close contacts of the most recent case and that no one else requires preventive treatment at this time.

As part of its response, the university will offer vaccination clinics on Wednesday, March 8, and Thursday, March 9, in McAlexander Field House from 9 a.m. through 6 p.m.

In advance, please check with your insurance carrier regarding coverage for receiving a meningococcal B vaccination at OSU. Be sure your insurance provider understands that the Corvallis campus has been designated by public health officials to have an “outbreak” status. Students without insurance will be provided the vaccine via other resources, and further communications about this assistance will be provided over the next week.

Awareness is very important in effectively managing meningococcal disease. While meningococcal disease is very serious for those who become infected, it is not a highly contagious disease. It most often affects individuals who are 25 years old or younger. It is transmitted only through direct contact with droplets from an ill person coughing or sneezing; other discharges from the nose or throat; by sharing of eating and drinking utensils, smoking devices; or intimate contact.

Symptoms of the disease include high fever, headache and stiff neck, diarrhea, vomiting and nausea. Some people do not get the full range of symptoms, but may exhibit a rapidly developing rash on the armpits, groin and ankles, as well as in areas where elastic pressure is applied.

Students experiencing these symptoms should immediately visit OSU Student Health Services located in the Plageman Building, 108 S.W. Memorial Place. If symptoms are sudden and severe or occur after hours, immediately go to an urgent care or hospital emergency room. Non-students experiencing symptoms should contact their primary care physician, an urgent care medical clinic or a nearby hospital emergency room.

More information on meningococcal disease is available by calling the OSU Student Health Services Nurse Advice line at 541-737-2724 or Benton County Health Department communicable disease nurses at 541-766-6835 or by visiting these websites:

http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/infectious-diseases/meningococcal-disease

http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/Pages/disease.aspx?did=51

Sincerely,

Mike Green
Interim Vice President
Finance and Administration

Susie Brubaker-Cole
Vice Provost
Student Affairs

Steve Clark
Vice President
University Relations and Marketing 


Jan. 10, 2017

Oregon State University students,

Welcome back to campus and winter term. I hope you had a good holiday break. 

As you may be aware, two Oregon State University students were diagnosed in November with Type B meningococcal disease.

I am writing to share that the best way to prevent meningococcal disease is by vaccination. You may want to consider being vaccinated for Type B meningococcal disease if you have not already taken this step. Please contact Student Health Services (SHS) at 541-737-2724 or your health care provider to determine the need for this vaccine. It is also advisable to contact your insurance carrier for information on coverage for meningococcal B vaccine.

Note that to ensure full immunization, you must complete a two- or three-dose series of vaccinations, depending on the brand of vaccine.

If you have already started the vaccination series, OSU Student Health Services (SHS) can provide follow-up doses. It is imperative that you communicate the date of your initial vaccination dose and the brand received when you visit SHS.

If you want to begin the vaccination process, SHS can also help with that as well.

Be aware that the B strain of meningococcal disease is not covered by the quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine that OSU requires upon admission for first year students under 22. 

As a reminder, meningococcal disease is transmitted through direct contact with droplets from an ill person coughing or sneezing; other discharges from the nose or throat; or by sharing of eating and drinking utensils, smoking devices; or intimate contact. Health officials encourage everyone to monitor their own health and note the following symptoms that may accompany this disease: high fever, a significant weakness, headache, stiff neck, rash, exhaustion, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

If you experience these symptoms, please immediately contact SHS, your primary care physician or a nearby urgent care medical clinic or emergency room.

More information on meningococcal disease is available by visiting these websites:

http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/infectious-diseases/meningococcal-disease

or

http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/Pages/disease.aspx?did=51

Best of luck with your classes this term.  

Susie Brubaker-Cole
Vice Provost
Student Affairs


Dec. 12, 2016

Winter Break and meningococcal vaccinations

If you plan to get vaccinated for Meningococcal disease (type B) while home on winter break, please pay attention to the brand of vaccine you are given:

>> Bexsero® requires two doses, the second dose given one month following
the first

>> Trumenba® requires three doses, the second given 30-60 days after the initial dose, and the third dose given at 6 months.

These vaccines cannot be intermixed. Student Health Services can provide follow up doses of either Bexsero® or Trumenba® once you have returned to Oregon State University.

If you have already received a first dose of Meningococcal B vaccine at SHS, or in Corvallis, you will want to follow up with the second or subsequent dose while home on break. It is important you let your health care provider know which brand of vaccine you started.

Student Health Services is currently using Bexsero. Providers in the community are using either Bexsero or Trumemba. Call Student Health Services if you do not remember the brand or the date you received your first dose.

Check with your insurance carrier about reimbursement. Many plans will cover this vaccine. Note: there is broad insurance coverage for the quadrivalent ACWY vaccine that is currently required for incoming students under the age of 22. This vaccine does not provide protection against meningococcal B.


Nov. 18, 2016

Meningococcal vaccinations to be offered

Oregon State University and the Benton County Health Department continued Friday to identify and treat with preventive antibiotics OSU students who may have come into close contact with a second student diagnosed this week with meningococcal disease.

“It is important that students who have had close contact receive antibiotic treatment as soon as possible,” said Paul Cieslak, medical director for the communicable disease division at the Oregon Health Authority. “Other students are likely to be at much lower risk.”

Two undergraduate students attending Oregon State are being treated this week at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis for meningococcal disease.

One student is being treated for meningococcal disease strain B and is listed by the hospital to be in good condition. Test results for the second student, who also is listed in good condition, were inconclusive. More detailed laboratory analysis for the second student by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be available next week.

“For students under 25 years of age, a meningococcal-B vaccine is available at OSU Student Health Services,” said Jeff Mull, medical director for OSU Student Health Services.

OSU Student Health Services is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. The center is closed Sundays and is located in the Plageman Building, at 108 S.W. Memorial Place

“Oregon State University continues to work closely with our partners in public health at the county and state,” said Steve Clark, vice president of University Relations at Oregon State University. “We continue to undertake every effort possible to inform, help treat, educate, and provide for our students and the public’s health.”

“We continue to emphasize what this disease is; who may be at risk; how a person may recognize symptoms of the disease; what a person should do if they recognize the symptoms; and how our students, faculty, staff and the public can prevent being affected.”

Approximately 160 people have been provided preventive antibiotics since Sunday.

Symptoms of meningococcal disease are high fever, headache, stiff neck, exhaustion, nausea, rash, vomiting and diarrhea. Some people do not get meningitis, but they contract an infection of the bloodstream, which causes fever and a rash. Individuals who have spent at least four hours cumulatively in close, face-to-face association with a person suffering from meningococcal disease within seven days before the illness started are most at risk of catching meningococcal disease.

“It is important to continue to monitor your own health,” said Dr. Bruce Thomson, Benton County health officer.

Anyone experiencing these symptoms should immediately visit their primary care physician or a nearby urgent care medical clinic or emergency room. OSU students experiencing these symptoms should visit OSU Student Health Services.

Meningococcal disease is not highly contagious and is transmitted through direct contact with droplets from an ill person coughing or sneezing; other discharges from the nose or throat; by sharing of eating and drinking utensils, smoking devices; or intimate contact.

More information on meningococcal disease is available by calling the OSU Student Health Services Nurse Advice line at 541-737-2724 or Benton County Health Department communicable disease nurses at 541-766-6835 or by visiting these websites:

http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/infectious-diseases/meningococcal-disease

or

http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/Pages/disease.aspx?did=51

More information will be provided as available.