Alcohol and Other Drugs

Oregon State University is committed to maintaining an educational environment and workplace free from drugs and alcohol. The university supports programs for the prevention of abuse of alcohol and controlled substances by university students and employees, as well as assistance programs for those with problems related to controlled substance abuse. We strive to educate the campus community about responsible alcohol and other drug use.

Federal Regulations

Part 86, the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations (Education Department General Administrative Regulations [EDGAR]), requires that, as a condition of receiving funds or any other form of financial assistance under any federal program, an institution of higher education (IHE) must certify that it has adopted and implemented a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees. If audited, failure to comply with the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations may cause an institution to forfeit eligibility for federal funding.

In order to be able to certify its compliance with the regulations, an IHE must adopt and implement a drug prevention program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by all students and employees both on school premises and as part of any of its activities. Creating a program that complies with the regulations requires an IHE to do the following:

  • Annually notify each employee and student, in writing, of standards of conduct; a description of appropriate sanctions for violation of federal, state, and local law and campus policy; a description of health risks associated with AOD use; and a description of available treatment programs.­­
  • Develop a sound method for distributing annual notification information to every student and staff member each year.
  • Prepare a biennial review on the effectiveness of its AOD programs and the consistency of sanction enforcement.
  • Maintain its biennial review on file, so that, if requested to do so by the U.S. Department of Education, the campus can submit it.

Annual Notification

2015-2016 Annual Notification of Alcohol and Other Drug Information

OSU is required by law to notify annually all students, staff, and faculty of alcohol and other drug policies, sanctions, and risks associated with use.

This notification provides the campus community the following information:

  1. Drug and alcohol programs available to employees and/or students
  2. Health risks associated with alcohol abuse and illicit drug use

C. Standards of conduct and disciplinary sanctions for students regarding alcohol and drug use

  1. Standards of conduct and disciplinary sanctions for employees regarding alcohol and drug use
  2. Federal and state legal sanctions

Information for Students, Faculty, and Staff of Oregon State University

A. Drug and alcohol programs available to employees or students

At Oregon State University, we strive to provide an excellent teaching and learning environment that supports healthy choices for living. Included in the choices that confront everyone are decisions about the use of alcohol and other substances. If you or someone you know is being affected by alcohol or drug use, please use the recommended resources below. If you have any questions about the purpose of this email or its content, please contact:

Resources for Students

Student Health Services now offers individual counseling with a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). Sessions with the CADC are confidential and can help students create a personalized plan to meet their goals related to reducing substance use. Sessions are free unless referred as part of a conduct violations or other sanction. To make an appointment, call 541-737-9355.

e-CHUG

Online at: http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/prevention-center/e-chug

The e-CHUG is a brief, anonymous, online assessment tool. It takes about 10 minutes to complete and helps students understand their use of alcohol.

e-TOKE

Online at: http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/prevention-center/e-toke

The electronic THC Online Knowledge Experience, or e-TOKE, is a brief, interactive marijuana-specific assessment and feedback tool that provides insight into marijuana use, using personalized information about students’ behaviors and risk factors. It takes about 10-15 minutes to complete and is self-guided making it quick, anonymous, and flexible to fit a student’s free time and location.

Counseling and Psychological Services (541-737-2131)

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is dedicated to addressing the challenges and difficulties students face. The services provided by CAPS are designed to help students understand themselves better, create and maintain satisfying relationships, improve their academic performance, and make healthy and satisfying career and life choices. To schedule your appointment or learn about services please visit: http://counseling.oregonstate.edu/

Collegiate Recovery Community: Student Success Built on Sobriety (541-737-1184 or recovery@oregonstate.edu)

The Collegiate Recovery Community (CRC) seeks to provide engaging and understanding support to students in recovery or those who are contemplating entering into recovery. The community is rooted in the belief that no student should feel alone and that every student should receive the support they need, in the way they need it, from the people who they find most comfortable. CRC’s doors are open to anyone who is looking for support. In fall of 2016, University Housing & Dining Services will launch a dedicated recovery living community with scholarships available to students. For more information about the CRC or special housing options, see: http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/recovery

AlcoholEdu

The Alcohol, Drug, & Violence Prevention Center (ADVPC), with support from the Vice Provost of Student Affairs, requires all new first-year, degree-seeking students on both the Corvallis and Cascades campuses to complete the online program, AlcoholEdu. This requirement has been implemented to help foster an environment that prevents high-risk alcohol use and subsequent negative academic and personal outcomes. AlcoholEdu is just one of many methods which attempt to correct college myths and norms, as well as provide students with relevant policies and resources prior to matriculation.

There is evidence which supports the efficacy of AlcoholEdu. In the program, students are taken through several interactive modules that include lessons such as, but not limited to, how to recognize and respond to an alcohol-related emergency; how to use low-risk drinking strategies; how to model safer decision-making; and strategies to be an active bystander. Students are required to complete Part 1 of this two-part course prior to the first day of classes, and Part 2 thirty days after completion of Part 1. If students do not complete either or both parts of AlcoholEdu, a Grades Hold is placed on their student account. That hold is lifted once a student completes all parts of the course. For more information about AlcoholEdu please visit: http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/welcome

Resources for Faculty and Staff

  • Donna Chastain

Office of Human Resources

122 Kerr Administration Building Employment Services 541-737-2806 or human.resources@oregonstate.edu

Employees interested in more information may contact: Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

Contact: Cascade Centers Inc. 1-800-433-2320

OSU provides an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) available to all employees with .50 FTE or greater appointments. Through this program, each employee is allowed up three visits per calendar year at no cost for evaluation, limited counseling, and referral. Employees who live and work elsewhere in the state are provided the same services in their local areas. All employee contact with the EAP is confidential.

For more information: http://www.oregon.gov/oha/pebb/Pages/EAPIndex.aspx

Time off Work

Employees seeking treatment for substance abuse may be eligible for time off from work through the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and/or Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA). Contact the Benefits section of Human Resources at 541-737-2805 for more information.

Health Insurance Coverage for Treatment

PEBB Health Insurance plans (PEBB Statewide, Providence, Moda, Kaiser, and AllCare) provide coverage for treatment. Consult your medical plan for details. For questions or assistance, contact the Benefits section of Human Resources at 541-737-2805.

Resources for Students, Faculty, or Staff

12-Step Programs: OSU acknowledges the value of 12-step programs in attaining and maintaining a drug-free lifestyle. Schedules of meetings for Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Cocaine Anonymous, Al- anon, and other 12-step groups can be obtained from the Benton County Health Department, 530 N.W. 27th St., 541-766-6835 or by visiting:

AA meetings: http://aaoregon-district21.org/meetings/ NA Meetings: www.lbana.org

B. Health risks associated with alcohol abuse and illicit drug use

Commonly Abused Drugs

http://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/commonly-abused-drugs/commonly-abused-drugs-chart

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Nicotine

Found in cigarettes, cigars, bidis, smokeless tobacco (snuff, spit tobacco, chew)

Smoked, snorted, chewed

  • Acute Effects - Increased blood pressure and heart rate
    • Health Risks - Chronic lung disease; cardiovascular disease; stroke; cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, cervix, kidney, bladder, and acute myeloid leukemia; adverse pregnancy outcomes; addiction

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Alcohol (ethyl alcohol)

Found in liquor, beer, and wine

Swallowed

  • Acute Effects - In low doses, euphoria, mild stimulation, relaxation, lowered inhibitions; in higher doses, drowsiness, slurred speech, nausea, emotional volatility, loss of coordination, visual distortions, impaired memory, sexual dysfunction, loss of consciousness
  • Health Risks - Increased risk of injuries, violence, fetal damage (in pregnant women); depression; neurologic deficits; hypertension; liver and heart disease; addiction; fatal overdose

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Marijuana

Blunt, dope, ganja, grass, herb, joint, bud, Mary Jane, pot, reefer, green, trees, smoke, sinsemilla, skunk, weed

Smoked, swallowed

Hashish

Boom, gangster, hash, hash oil, hemp

Smoked, swallowed

  • Acute Effects - Euphoria; relaxation; slowed reaction time; distorted sensory perception; impaired balance and coordination; increased heart rate and appetite; impaired learning, memory; anxiety; panic attacks; psychosis
  • Health Risks - Cough, frequent respiratory infections; possible mental health decline; addiction

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Heroin

Diacetylmorphine: smack, horse, brown sugar, dope, H, junk, skag, skunk, white horse, China white; cheese (with OTC cold medicine and antihistamine)

Injected, smoked, snorted

Opium

Laudanum, paregoric: big O, black stuff, block, gum, hop

Swallowed, smoked

  • Acute Effects - Euphoria; drowsiness; impaired coordination; dizziness; confusion; nausea; sedation; feeling of heaviness in the body; slowed or arrested breathing
  • Health Risks - Constipation; endocarditis; hepatitis; HIV; addiction; fatal overdose

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Cocaine

Cocaine hydrochloride: blow, bump, C, candy, Charlie, coke, crack, flake, rock, snow, toot

snorted, smoked, injected

Amphetamine

Biphetamine, Dexedrine: bennies, black beauties, crosses, hearts, LA turnaround, speed, truck drivers, uppers

swallowed, snorted, smoked, injected

Methamphetamine

Desoxyn: meth, ice, crank, chalk, crystal, fire, glass, go fast, speed

swallowed, snorted, smoked, injected

  • Acute Effects - Increased heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, metabolism; feelings of exhilaration; increased energy, mental alertness; tremors; reduced appetite; irritability; anxiety; panic; paranoia; violent behavior; psychosis
  • Health Risks - Weight loss, insomnia; cardiac or cardiovascular complications; stroke; seizures; addiction
  • Also, for cocaine - Nasal damage from snorting
  • Also, for methamphetamine - Severe dental problems

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

MDMA

(methylenedioxy- methamphetamine)

Ecstasy, Adam, clarity, Eve, lover's speed, peace, uppers

swallowed, snorted, injected

Flunitrazepam**

Rohypnol: forget-me pill, Mexican Valium, R2, roach, Roche, roofies, roofinol, rope, rophies

swallowed, snorted

GHB**

Gamma-hydroxybutyrate: G, Georgia home boy, grievous bodily harm, liquid ecstasy, soap, scoop, goop, liquid X

swallowed

  • Acute Effects, for MDMA -Mild hallucinogenic effects; increased tactile sensitivity; empathic feelings; lowered inhibition; anxiety; chills; sweating; teeth clenching; muscle cramping
    • Also, for Flunitrazepam -Sedation; muscle relaxation; confusion; memory loss; dizziness; impaired coordination
    • Also, for GHB -Drowsiness; nausea; headache; disorientation; loss of coordination; memory loss
    • Health Risks, for MDMA -Sleep disturbances; depression; impaired memory; hyperthermia; addiction
    • Also, for Flunitrazepam -Addiction
    • Also, for GHB -Unconsciousness; seizures; coma

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Ketamine

Ketalar SV: cat Valium, K, Special K, vitamin K

injected, snorted, smoked

PCP and analogs

Phencyclidine: angel dust, boat, hog, love boat, peace pill

swallowed, smoked, injected

Salvia divinorum

Salvia, Shepherdess's Herb, Maria Pastora, magic mint, Sally-D

chewed, swallowed, smoked

Dextromethorphan (DXM)

Found in some cough and cold medications: Robotripping, Robo, Triple C

swallowed

  • Acute Effects -Feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment; impaired motor function
  • Also, for ketamine -Analgesia; impaired memory; delirium; respiratory depression and arrest; death
  • Also, for PCP and analogs -Analgesia; psychosis; aggression; violence; slurred speech; loss of coordination; hallucinations
  • Also, for DXM -Euphoria; slurred speech; confusion; dizziness; distorted visual perceptions
    • Health Risks -Anxiety; tremors; numbness; memory loss; nausea

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

LSD

Lysergic acid diethylamide: acid, blotter, cubes, microdot yellow sunshine, blue heaven

swallowed, absorbed through mouth tissues

Mescaline

Buttons, cactus, mesc, peyote

swallowed, smoked

Psilocybin

Magic mushrooms, purple passion, shrooms, little smoke

swallowed

  • Acute Effects -Altered states of perception and feeling; hallucinations; nausea
  • Also, for LSD -Increased body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure; loss of appetite; sweating; sleeplessness; numbness, dizziness, weakness, tremors; impulsive behavior; rapid shifts in emotion
  • Also, for Mescaline -Increased body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure; loss of appetite; sweating; sleeplessness; numbness, dizziness, weakness, tremors; impulsive behavior; rapid shifts in emotion
  • Also, for Psilocybin -Nervousness; paranoia; panic
  • Health Risks, for LSD -Flashbacks, Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

Anabolic steroids

Anadrol, Oxandrin, Durabolin, Depo- Testosterone, Equipoise: roids, juice, gym candy, pumpers

Injected, swallowed, applied to skin

Inhalants

Solvents (paint thinners, gasoline, glues); gases (butane, propane, aerosol propellants, nitrous oxide); nitrites (isoamyl, isobutyl, cyclohexyl): laughing gas, poppers, snappers, whippets

Inhaled through nose or mouth

  • Acute Effects, for Anabolic steroids -No intoxication effects
    • Also, for Inhalants (varies by chemical) -Stimulation; loss of inhibition; headache; nausea or vomiting; slurred speech; loss of motor coordination; wheezing
    • Health Risks, for Anabolic steroids -Hypertension; blood clotting and cholesterol changes; liver cysts; hostility and aggression; acne; in adolescents—premature stoppage of growth; in males—prostate cancer, reduced sperm production, shrunken testicles, breast enlargement; in females—menstrual irregularities, development of beard and other masculine characteristics
  • Also, for Inhalants -Cramps; muscle weakness; depression; memory impairment; damage to cardiovascular and nervous systems; unconsciousness; sudden death

Category and Name

Examples of Commercial and Street Names

How Administered*

CNS  Depressants

For more information on prescription medications, please visit the Commonly Abused Prescription Drug Chart

Stimulants

Opioid Pain Relievers

Notes

* Some of the health risks are directly related to the route of drug administration. For example, injection drug use can increase the risk of infection through needle contamination with staphylococci, HIV, hepatitis, and other organisms.

** Associated with sexual assaults.

Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment

More than three decades of scientific research show that treatment can help drug-addicted individuals stop drug use, avoid relapse, and successfully recover their lives. Based on this research, 13 fundamental principles that characterize effective drug abuse treatment have been developed. These principles are detailed in NIDA's Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide. The guide also describes different types of science-based treatments and provides answers to commonly asked questions.

C. Standards of conduct and disciplinary sanctions for students regarding alcohol and drug use

Student Conduct and Community Standards

The current Student Conduct Code can be found here: http://studentlife.oregonstate.edu/sites/studentlife.oregonstate.edu/files/student_conduct_code_1.pdf

University Housing and Dining Policy Guide

The current student University Housing and Dining Policy Guide can be found here: http://oregonstate.edu/uhds/sites/default/files/policy_guide_2014-2015.pdf

Students that are found responsible for violation of university policy related to alcohol or drugs are typically referred to the IMPACT program at Student Health Services. For more information on the IMPACT program, please  visit:  http://studenthealth.oregonstate.edu/impact

D. Standards of conduct and disciplinary sanctions for employees regarding alcohol and drug use

Oregon State University responds to cases of alcohol abuse and illegal drug activity by employees or students on a case-by-case basis. Details of each case are taken into consideration along with outcome of any legal action against the individual. Employees and students found to be in violation of the University’s drug-free campus and workplace policy may be subject to conduct or disciplinary sanctions consistent with applicable provisions of state and federal laws, as well as University and Oregon State Board of Higher Education administrative rules. Sanctions imposed by the University can range from a warning or disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment or suspension from school. Other potential sanctions may include employment or academic probation, restrictions, attendance in an educational program, or referral to counseling or treatment. OSU employees and students who violate drug laws are subject to prosecution in the courts. Additionally, the law requires the University to report to the United States Department of Education any recipient of federal financial aid (e.g., Pell Grants, research grants) who is convicted of a drug- related crime on University property or at University events. The law also requires the University to report to federal agencies any employee convicted of violating a criminal drug statute if the employee is involved in work which is supported by that federal agency.

Oregon State University complies with the United States Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act, the United States Drug-Free Workplace Act, Oregon Revised Statues 352.008, and OSSHE Administrative Rule 580-19-

001. Annual distribution of drug-free campus and workplace information to employees and students is required by law.

For more information please visit: http://hr.oregonstate.edu/policies-procedures/employees

E. Federal and state legal sanctions

The following are federal penalties and sanctions for illegal possession of a controlled substance. Additional penalties are imposed for trafficking.

21 U.S.C. 844(a)

First conviction: Up to one year imprisonment and fined at least $1,000 but not more than $100,000, or both.

After one prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed two years and fined at least

$2,500 but not more than $250,000, or both.

After two or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed three years and fined at least $5,000 but not more than $250,000, or both.

Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine: Mandatory at least five years in prison, not to exceed 20 years and fined up to $250,000, or both, if:

1st conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds five grams.

2nd crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds three grams.

3rd or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds one gram.

21 U.S.C. 853(a)(2) and 881(a)(7)

Forfeiture of personal real property used to possess or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than one year imprisonment. (See special sentencing provisions re: crack.)

21 U.S.C. 881(c)(4)

Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled  substance.

21 U.S.C. 844a

Civil fine of up to $10,000 (pending adoption of final regulations).

21 U.S.C. 853a

Denial of Federal benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts, and professional and commercial licenses, up to one year for first offense, up to five years for second and subsequent offenses.

18 U.S.C. 922(g).

Ineligible to receive or purchase a firearm.

Miscellaneous.

Revocation of certain Federal licenses and benefits, e.g., pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., are vested within the authorities of individual Federal agencies.

Oregon State University complies with the United States Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act, the United States Drug-Free Workplace Act, Oregon Revised Statues 352.008, and OSSHE Administrative Rule 580-19-

001. Annual distribution of drug-free campus and workplace information to employees and students is required by law.

State of Oregon Sanctions

For current information regarding Measure 91 in Oregon please visit: http://www.oregon.gov/olcc/marijuana/Pages/default.aspx

Oregon Chapter 475 — Controlled Substances; Illegal Drug Cleanup; Paraphernalia; Precursors https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/ors/ors475.html

Oregon Chapter 471 – Alcoholic Liquors; Controlled Substances; Drugs https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/ors/ors471.html

For guide to alcohol laws and minors: http://www.oregon.gov/olcc/docs/publications/oregons_alcohol_laws_and_minors.pdf